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Look with electrification, obviously there's a big movement towards that. There's all sorts of investments, there's all sorts of stories. There's all sorts of chatter. To me it's exactly the point of when do you strike the marketplace? And of course that's going to be a balance. First and foremost you have the ZEV and compliance and CO2 mandates that are coming from the government without a doubt. The second thing of course you have is you have the ability now with the technology and of course the lower cost of that technology to put a proper car on the road. And the third one is customer sentiment for electric cars is getting stronger and stronger each and every year. In my mind it's sort of swung from, what is an electric car? Then it swung to, I know what an electric car is, I don't want one. Now it's swung through, I'm interested in the car and now it's, I'm interested in that being my next car. I'm always pretty straightforward with these things. What a consumer wants is they want to buy the future and they buy something that's extremely cool. And I think Volkswagen's going to put a car on the marketplace that's going to be the future, that's going to be extremely cool. But the big trick here is getting the price right. I can drive the future at the right price for me. And if you look at what sells cars, it's pretty straightforward what sells cars. What sells cars is driver image. Someone pulls up and see someone else in a vehicle and they say wait, they have something I don't have. They have the future. And you get that tipping point and when the tipping point comes... Boom. And that's exactly what we're looking at with electric vehicles. That tip is happening between customer demand, price points, and putting a real car on the marketplace. Not a quirky car. A real car. And that's what we have.

On Monday, Jan. 14, Volkswagen (VLKAY) announced that it selected its manufacturing plant in Chattanooga, Tenn., as ground zero for the company's first electric vehicle facility in North America.  TheStreet contributor M. Corey Goldman covered the news

The German automaker confirmed in a news release coinciding with the kickoff of the Detroit Auto Show Monday that it will expand its plant in Chattanooga and create 1,000 jobs there as the factory gears up for electric vehicle production beginning in 2022.

Volkswagen currently employs 3,500 people in Tennessee, and at year-end will have invested $2.3 billion in the facility. The Chattanooga plant produces the midsize Atlas SUV and Passat sedan and will begin building the Atlas Cross Sport, a five-seat version of the model, this year.

Scott Keogh, CEO of VW of America, will head up Volkswagen's electric vehicle team. Keogh sat down with TheStreet about the future of electric cars and how VW is becoming a U.S. company thanks to the Tennessee news. 

"What a consumer wants is they want to buy the future and they buy something that's extremely cool. And I think Volkswagen's going to put a car on the marketplace that's going to be the future, that's going to be extremely cool. But the big trick here is getting the price right. I can drive the future at the right price for me. And if you look at what sells cars, it's pretty straightforward what sells cars," he said. "What sells cars is driver image. Someone pulls up and see someone else in a vehicle and they say wait, they have something I don't have. They have the future. And you get that tipping point and when the tipping point comes... Boom. And that's exactly what we're looking at with electric vehicles. That tip is happening between customer demand, price points, and putting a real car on the marketplace. Not a quirky car. A real car. And that's what we have."