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James Lamb: 9/11, the first thing that comes to mind was that it was a beautiful morning. My coworker and I were walking back from the trading desk, which was at the World Financial Center. And as we're approaching the World Trade Center, and we decided to walk outside in Austin Tobin Plaza and where the fountain was and as we were walking closer to the fountain. The closer we got the louder, these jet engines were reverberating through the plaza. And as we were coming up on the fountain, all of a sudden we heard this massive explosion.

Peter Tuchman: You could see ash flying through the sky. There was paper flying everywhere. So it was not, I didn't know at the time what really had happened. As we strolled up, you could just see things. I've been flying out of the windows of the towers all over Wall Street, but literally it was snowing ash. And as we walked up to the stock exchange up to the building, we got sort of thrust in there and we went into a lockdown situation. Cause obviously somebody knew what was going on already. Although to me, I did not. I just knew we were in trouble and we got onto the floor and obviously what transpired over the next few minutes, you know, the second building got hit.

John M. Monaco: We could hear the explosion here on the floor before we see it on TV because of the delay on television, which was shocking to us. It was like an earthquake. At that point the most intriguing change I thought was the first time that I saw the country come together. It was a very positive and the retrospect of a nation that put their bickering aside and wanted to as one respond to what had happened to us. That was the most impressive thing that I saw.

Steve Delamar: My prayers and thoughts go out to the families, the fireman, DMTs, everybody that was here that day. I can't say enough that it just never leaves. And I just hope one day that everybody gets peace over this day.

Wall Street marked a day of grievance, and one that almost everyone remembers. 

The day when the whole country came into standstill - September 11, 2001.

"I remember the whole day, I remember everything afterwards," said Peter M. Tuchman, Trader at the New York Stock Exchange, who was also working on the floor that day. "As we walked up to the Stock Exchange up to the building, we got sort of thrust in there and we went into a lockdown situation," he added.

Another trader John M. Monaco, who was also working at the Stock Exchange on that day also have a vivid memory of that day.

"We saw a lot of people really get together and work as one, which was a very nice thing. It was the first time that I saw the country come together," he said. " It was a very positive in the retrospect of a nation that put their bickering aside and wanted to as one respond to what had happened to us. That was the most impressive thing that I saw."

The U.S. markets were closed for four days during that time, which was also the single longest closure since 1933.

A memorial service took place for the 9/11 victims this morning at the World Trade Center. 

Steve Delamar, 63, from Central Islip, New York was there to offer his prayers. Delamar, who also lost his friend in that attack said, " I just hope one day that everybody gets peace."

Related: Jim Cramer: 9/11 Was the Pearl Harbor of Our Generation

Related: NYSE Observes Moment of Silence On 9/11 Anniversary

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