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Tony Owusu: US Women's soccer team, they're having a ticker tape parade just outside of our offices. And equal pay has come up as a result of their win. What are your thoughts on their crusade to be paid equitabally.

Tiki Barber: I think their timing is perfect, right? They filed the lawsuit before the women's World Cup kicked off a couple of weeks ago. And they're making a statement. If they had done this a year ago, we wouldn't have paid attention. But the fact that they filed this lawsuit against the United States Soccer Federation and they want equal pay with men, and the fact that they win the World Cup and I mean, dominating fashion from the Thailand blowout to the tea cup, the Alex Morgan teacup celebration to you know Megan Rapinoe's Golden Ball and golden boot. I mean, it was, it was fantastic, right? It was emotionally lifting to watch our US women win the World Cup in the fashion that they did it. And then to bring a message along behind it. One that's important to be told. And one that I think they have a legitimate gripe for is fantastic. The question will be, how does it happen, right? As we said, we were talking about this off air. You can't Hashtag this into existence. There's a couple of factors. Obviously the US soccer federation is a not for profit, right? The money comes from the big organizations. We all know FIFA.

Tony Owusu: Which has its own issues.

Tiki Barber: Which has major issues as we've heard over the years. But they also don't put money into women's sports, right? They put 400 million into US, the men's World Cup, they put 30 into the women's World Cup. And so the equitability is not right. It was one of the most watched and enjoyed sports broadcast.

Tony Owusu: On the same day that the men, the men lost..

Tiki Barber: TheCopa. And you know, Brazil won. No, the Gold Cup the men lost in Mexico and Brazil one the Copa Cup. But still they were an example, and they are an example for many different reasons, and they should be paid equally.

Fresh off of their second consecutive World Cup win, the U.S. Women's National Team is well positioned to demand equal pay as the men's team, according to former NFL running back and co-founder of Grove Group Management Tiki Barber. 

As the team celebrates their win with a ticker tape parade down Broadway in New York City, the buzz around the team has become a platform for social equity. 

"I think their timing is perfect? They filed the lawsuit before the women's World Cup kicked off a couple of weeks ago. Um, and they're making a statement. If they had done this a year ago, we wouldn't have paid attention," the former Pro Bowler told The Street. "It was, it was emotionally lifting to watch our US women win the World Cup in the fashion that they did it and then to bring a message along behind it. One that's important to be told, and one that I think they have a legitimate gripe for is fantastic."

The U.S. team filed a lawsuit against the U.S. soccer governing body alleging "institutional gender discrimination" on March 8 ahead of this summer's World Cup. 

FIFA, the global governing body for the World Cup, pays out a $400 million prize to the men's soccer tournament winners, while the women only receive a $30 million payout. 

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