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You've mentioned health care and I want to ask with all the debate around healthcare, where does gene therapy fall? Well, I look, I belong to the school that believes the long run solution to health care is wellness and, and that if you can get cures for these major diseases, nothing will do more to, to solve the cost of healthcare. If you've got a cure for Alzheimer's for example, uh, you basically change the entire trajectory of health spending for the next 50 years. So I'm very much into it. I very much liked, uh, one Lamar Alexander and Fred Upton did with their 21st-century wellness bill. And gene therapy is a key part of that. This is the whole DNA project from the time Crick and Watson discovered the double helix all the way up through the human genome project to today, has really began to get at that the very center of how we function as an organism. And so we're beginning to get breakthroughs. I did a podcast recently in which we talked about a very particular gene therapy that enables children who are going to go blind to see. I mean, it literally replaces the genetic defect and enables them to see for the entire rest of their life. Uh, we think that there are going to be breakthroughs in sickle cell anemia or we're very close to breakthroughs in hemophilia and you start looking at those kinds of things. Um, and you begin to realize that, uh, gene therapy could be one of the most powerful tools that we've ever had. Uh, and that it has an almost endless potential, uh, to deal with a very, very wide range of problems that uh, historically we sort of lumped together and didn't understand that the more details we understand, the more complex the human body is and the more we have to be in aw of all the different pieces that are moving. For example, what we used to call breast cancers a generalization is actually probably 200 different cancers. Uh, now that's a level of detailed knowledge and let's just start thinking about what do I need for this particular cancer? And it allows you to have a much narrower treatments with much less side effects, uh, and in the long run get people back to health much more rapidly. Now what you just said, gene therapy, it sounds like expands so much further than just sickle cell research, which is what I'm most familiar with. And if I'm an investor and I just listened to your answer there, I'm wondering if I have no experience in the biomedical space, how do I even start looking at gene therapy? How do I start investing in that space? Well, I would say, first of all, if you're going to get into a field that is as complex as gene therapy, uh, you ought to go to some experts. You ought to look at things. I recently did a workshop that is going to be done I think is going to be done in the very near future. Let's, a, UShealthandwealth.com and our, what we were focusing on as we put this workshop together because we're focusing on how do you think about these things and how do you look at these companies. But I would say if you're, if you're just starting a, that you need to look to the experts who spent years of their lives, uh, dealing with this kind of thing. And I had the great privilege of working with Marc Lichtenfeld, so who just knows a lot and he spent 22 years studying it. Well, I'm never going to know as much about specific companies as he does. I can know a fair amount about gene therapy. And frankly, you can learn a lot about gene therapy either by listening to my podcast on that topic or by just going to a Wikipedia and other sources online and getting a general, general structure of what it is. But I think you have to have a lot more knowledge, uh, to then know which companies you might want to invest in.

Is gene therapy the future?

Newt Gingrich, a former Speaker of the House, thinks so. 

He sat down with TheStreet to explain his thoughts on the sector and why investors should pay close attention to the sector. 

Here's what he had to say about gene therapy.


"I belong to the school that believes the long run solution to health care is wellness and, and that if you can get cures for these major diseases, nothing will do more to solve the cost of healthcare," he explained. 

"Well, I would say, first of all, if you're going to get into a field that is as complex as gene therapy, you ought to go to some experts. You ought to look at things. But I would say if you're just starting...that you need to look to the experts who spent years of their lives dealing with this kind of thing," said Gingrich. 

Watch the full interview with Newt Gingrich below.

Newt Gingrich on the U.S.-China Trade Talks, Biotech and Advice for Investors