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UNLESS YOU'RE PUTTING YOUR RETIREMENT SAVINGS IN A ROTH ACCOUNT WHEN YOU BUILD YOUR IRA OR 401(K) BALANCE, YOU'RE ALSO BUILDING A TAX BILL. BECAUSE TAX-DEFERRED ACCOUNTS ONLY POSTPONE THE PAYMENT OF TAXES.

HERE ARE SOME THINGS YOU CAN DO NOW TO RETIRE FROM TAXES SOME DAY.

IN A GUEST COLUMN FOR RETIREMENT DAILY, ADVISER KEITH WHITCOMB TALKS ABOUT THE "DELAYED TAX OBLIGATION" MANY RETIREMENT INVESTORS FACE. HE SAYS IT'S LIKE OWNING A HOUSE WITH A MORTGAGE: YOUR HOME EQUITY IS YOUR NET VALUE AFTER THE MORTGAGE. INSTEAD OF DECLINING OVER TIME THE TAX LIABILITY JUST CONTINUES TO GROW UNTIL YOU WITHDRAW MONEY FROM YOUR RETIREMENT SAVINGS.

HERE'S HOW WHITCOMB MEASURES THIS FUTURE TAX LIABILITY.

THE EASIEST METHOD IS TO ASSUME YOU REMOVE THE FUNDS FROM THE ACCOUNTS WITH ONE WITHDRAWAL WHEN YOU RETIRE. THIS IS BASICALLY A WORST-CASE SCENARIO THAT ESTIMATES THE MAXIMUM TAX IMPACT.

THE FORMULA IS: (ACCOUNT BALANCE) X (TAX RATE). YEP, IT'S THAT SIMPLE.

EVEN IF YOU CAN'T FULLY RETIRE FROM TAXES WHEN YOU RETIRE FROM WORK, YOU CAN REDUCE YOUR TAX BILL.

READ MORE FROM KEITH WHITCOMB ON RETIREMENT DAILY FROM THE STREET. IF YOU'RE NOT A SUBSCRIBER, SIGN UP FOR A FREE TRIAL.

Yes, you really can retire from taxes without evading your taxes.

Did you realize that tax-deferred accounts only postpone the payment of taxes?

Keith Whitcomb, who writes columns over on TheStreet's Retirement Daily, wrote about the "delayed tax obligation" that retirees face. 

According to Whitcomb, the delayed tax obligation is comparable to owning a house with a mortgage, your home equity is your net value after the mortgage.

Instead of declining over time, the tax liability just continues to grow until you withdraw money from your retirement savings. 

Related. Ask Bob: Social Security Spousal Benefits and Delaying Benefits

Related. Making the Most of Your Tax Brackets in Retirement

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