Midterm Election 2018: Wall Street Voters Say Go Out, Vote and Be Heard

"This is our chance to speak up and have our votes heard and have a government that represents all of us."
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There's been a lot of focus on voter turnout. This could be the biggest turnout in 50 years. Well, for good reason there's a lot at stake!

TheStreet's Anuz Thapa headed over to 90 Trinity Place and caught up with voters as they cast their ballot. "This is all of our chance to actually go out and vote because there were so many people who did not voted two years ago and look where we are now," said Barrie Ginsberg, who voted this morning. " This is our chance to speak up and have our votes heard and have a government that represents all of us."

Jim Cramer.

"We want to get past the election. Other than defense which would explode higher if the Republicans took the house... Once we get past this... we could have a nice rally." Watch: We Want to Get Past the Election,' Says Jim Cramer.

Kenny Polcari, a trader on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

"If you have a GOP win across both houses, the market takes off" He added, If you get the split, then you get gridlock (which the market doesn't necessarily mind)." Polcari says, "If you get a democratic win across both houses then the market backs off." Watch Kenny Polcari's full interview here: Politics and Portfolios:Politics and Portfolios: An Investor's Guide to the Midterms

Robert McDowell, former FCC commissioner and current partner at Cooley LLP.

The tech industry is juggling a lot this election day.

According to Robert McDowell, former FCC commissioner and current partner at Cooley LLP, issues affecting the tech industry include everything from trade policy and interest rates to broadband infrastructure spending. But with the possibility that one chamber of Congress may switch parties, prospective policy changes with momentum on both sides of the aisle might be especially worth keeping an eye on.

"One question is can the GOP and Democrats work together at all, on anything, but it could be that privacy is one of those areas," McDowell told TheStreet. "There's certainly been a change in popular opinion since Cambridge Analytica, and people are just more aware that their personal data could be used in ways they don't like. Politicians are seeing those polls, and are looking to modernize or change privacy policy."  Read What the Midterm Elections Could Mean for Big Tech

Looking for more midterms coverage?

TheStreet has your back. Check out some of the videos and articles below to break down the market impact from the midterms.

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