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We must make sure that everyone who occupies a pilot seat is fully armed with the information, knowledge, training, skill and judgment to experience to be able to, be the absolute master of the aircraft and all its components, systems, and of the situation simultaneously and continuously throughout the flight. As aviation has become safer, we can no longer define safety solely as the absence of accidents. We must do much more than that. We must be more proactive than that. In essence, we must investigate accidents before they happen. We should all want pilots to experience these challenging situations for the first time in a simulator and not in flight with passengers and crew on board and reading about it on an Ipad, if not even close to sufficient. Pilots must experience it physically firsthand. If we don't learn from these crashes, if we just file the finding, it'll go away on a shelf together dust. We will only compound these tragedies. We will make the loss of lives in these accidents, even more tragic if we say that these were just black swan events, unlikely to happen again and decide not to act and instead just protect the status quo. Only by discovering and correcting the ways in which these tragedies occurred, can we begin to regain the trust of our passengers, flight attendants, pilots, and the American people.

Famed retired pilot Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger said that pilots should experience the challenging situation 'for the first time in a simulator and not in flight with passengers and crew on board.'

Speaking at a congressional panel today, he stressed the importance of simulator training.

"We must investigate accidents before they happen," he said.

He continued, "We must make sure that everyone who occupies a pilot seat is fully armed with the information, knowledge, training, skill and judgment to experience to be able to, be the absolute master of the aircraft and all its components, systems, and of the situation simultaneously and continuously throughout the flight."

Leaders from Allied Pilots Association, leaders of the Association Flight attendants and Sullenberger were invited to testify before the subcommittee that is looking into Boeing and the 737 Max airliner, which is grounded after the two crashes that killed 346 people.

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