You put money away for a rainy day... but a hurricane -- or any disaster -- instantly can wipe it all out.

Even if you are covered by insurance, that money could take weeks, months or even years to hit your bank account.

Give me 60 seconds and I'll tell you where to find help. But here's what you need to know.

Put the credit card away and consider a loan from the Small Business Administration.

The SBA offers both homeowners and renters disaster loans up to $40,000 for property damage on things like furniture, clothing, cars and appliances and up to $200,000 for repairs to your house.

And the interest rate actually is pretty low.

If that doesn't work for you, you could tap your retirement accounts. But try to hit your Roth IRA or 401(k) before your traditional IRA.  When you borrow money from a traditional IRA, you have to put the money back in the account within 60 days or you'll get smacked with a 10% penalty tax on top of everything else.

But watch the video above now for more details.

 

More from Video

They Were Fired, Then a Billionaire Investor Helped Them Build Home Depot

They Were Fired, Then a Billionaire Investor Helped Them Build Home Depot

Veteran's Day: Hanger is Pushing Prosthetics Into the 'Internet of Things' Era

Veteran's Day: Hanger is Pushing Prosthetics Into the 'Internet of Things' Era

Why Home Depot and Retailers Are Betting on a Strong Holiday Shopping Season

Why Home Depot and Retailers Are Betting on a Strong Holiday Shopping Season

Has the Moment to Buy Starbucks Passed? Our Jim Cramer Weighs In

Has the Moment to Buy Starbucks Passed? Our Jim Cramer Weighs In

Ask Jim: Is Ford a Good Source of Dividend Income?

Ask Jim: Is Ford a Good Source of Dividend Income?