Around the world, people are eating more seafood, daily per capita fish consumption set to reach about 45 pounds by 2022, with most of the growth coming from China. But as wild catches are depleted, fish farming is taking off. Aquaculture is now a $140-billion plus industry, prompting a new dealmaking wave. Strategic buyers including Mitsubishi, of Japan, and Cargill, of Minnesota, are leading the way. NYSE-Marine Harvest, the world's top salmon farmer, is also still growing, opening its first feed factory in Norway in 2014 and building a new feed factory in Scotland in 2014. Interest is also strong among financial investors like the Aqua-Spark investment fund of the Netherlands, which has a goal of getting up to 60 to 80 portfolio companies over the course of 10 years across the value chain. The Deal's Renee Cordes reports from Brussels.

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