The Tiananmen Square protests 25 years ago marked a significant turning point for China's economy. By the time of the protests in 1989, economic reforms designed to boost China's economic prowess and subdue civilian protests had already been introduced. And just one year after the Tiananmen massacre, China's economy began to grow by about 10% a year. In 1989, China's economy stood at about a third of a trillion dollars, while today, it's stands at about $8.2 trillion. While China's growth has slowed in recent years amid the global economic slowdown and some argue that it could be headed for a hard landing, its economy is still expected to expand by 7.3% in 2014.

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