BlackBerry turned in its fourth quarter results of a loss of 80 cents a share, but then adjusted that number down to a loss of only eight cents per share. The number managed to beat analyst expectations and caused the stock to move high as a result. BlackBerry tried to emphasize the positives of cost cutting and lower inventory, but consumers are not buying the new BlackBerry 10 phone as much as the old BlackBerry 7 device. Profit breakeven isn't expected until 2015.

Disclosure: TheStreet's editorial policy prohibits staff editors, reporters and analysts from holding positions in any individual stocks.

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