Shares of Fitbit (FIT) - Get Report opened higher on Thursday and didn't looked back, doubling that gain by the end of trading. 

So what has the stock moving so far, so fast? The company's new Blaze smartwatch and Alta fitness devices are selling like hotcakes. In the first month of availability, the company has sold more than one million units for each device, a pace that not even Fitbit expected to see, let alone Wall Street. 

The results are sending shares of Fitbit higher because of what sales for each of these devices can do for the company's earnings and margins. The price for the Blaze comes in at $200, while the Alta prices in at $130. 

Given that shares of Fitbit have been walloped -- still down 48% despite Thursday's big rally -- this bit of good news is music to investors' ears.

Shares of Fitbit closed at $15.15 Thursday, up 13.1%. 

Amazon (AMZN) - Get Report wants to make sure that when you run out of something in constant use in your home, it gets replenished quickly...by them. 

The way the company's Dash Button works is pretty easy: Simply stick it in the area where you keep your product -- such as on the washing machine -- and when you're running low on detergent, simply press the button and viola! More Tide shows up two days later. 

In order to use the Dash Button, customers need to be Amazon Prime members. 

Amazon tripled the amount of available brands included in the Dash Button program, which now includes Energizer, Clorox (CLX) - Get Report , Brawny, Red Bull and many more. 

Ranging from coffee to Lysol to condoms, Amazon's got its customers covered. Each Dash Button costs $4.99 -- but after the first use, customers will receive a $4.99 credit to their Amazon account. 

So while it's not really free, assuming customers will keep using their Amazon Prime account to order things, it's eventually free. 

Shares of Amazon closed at $593.64 Thursday, down nearly 1%. 

Does Alphabet's  (GOOGL) - Get Report  Google owe Oracle (ORCL) - Get Report $8.8 billion? Oracle says yes, while -- surprise -- Google says it doesn't

The nearly $9 billion figure arises from Oracle's claim of a copyright infringement. In a new court filing, Google said it "strongly disagrees" with Oracle's claim that Google used "certain parts of the programming language Java in its Android operating system," according to Business Insider

Basically, Oracle is arguing Google used parts of a programming language that it owns, without paying for it. As a result, Oracle wants to be paid back. 

Barring a settlement, the case will head to court where it will be decided whether there was any wrongdoing on Google's part. The court date is scheduled for May, and for those of you just now hearing about it, it's actually been a six-year ordeal. 

Shares of Alphabet closed at $762.90, down nearly 1% Thursday. Oracle closed at $40.91, down a fraction of a percentage point.

This article is commentary by an independent contributor. At the time of publication, the author held no positions in the stocks mentioned.