NEW YORK (

TheStreet

) -Speculation has crept up again that

Research In Motion

(RIMM)

could be looking for buyers, as the company tries to soothe shareholders over its floundering stock price.

On Thursday,

chatter popped

on

Twitter

that the Waterloo, Ontario-based company has hired

Goldman Sachs

(GS) - Get Report

to consider "strategic alternatives."

Over the past year, RIM shares have lost 75% of their value, compared with competitors

Apple

(AAPL) - Get Report

and

Google

(GOOG) - Get Report

, which are up 22.1% and 1.9%, respectively, according to Google Finance.

There has been speculation before that RIM could be a candidate for a takeover, with

Amazon

(AMZN) - Get Report

,

Microsoft

(MSFT) - Get Report

and

Nokia

(NOK) - Get Report

mentioned

as potential buyers of the handset maker. Microsoft and Nokia were

cited

as potentially putting together a joint bid for the company, although that has not materialized.

Morningstar analyst Michael Holt put out a research note earlier this week voicing his skepticism about an acquisition, due to several roadblocks.

Holt mentioned that Microsoft has already picked a software strategy, and would not be interested in RIM's QNX-based assets at this point. He said that Amazon and RIM's customer bases do not match, due to the former's content focus and the latter's hardware focus.

"We believe RIM should entertain all options at this point, given the serious challenges facing the firm, but there is little evidence to suggest RIM's board is open to offers at this point in time," Holt wrote in his note. He has a $14 fair value on RIM.

Research In Motion and Goldman Sachs could not be immediately reached for comment for this story.

RIM shares were higher Thursday, up 3.6% to $16.17.

Interested in more on RIM? See TheStreet Ratings' report card for

this stock

.

The Street's rating system rates

RIM at hold.

Check out our new tech blog,

Tech Trends

.

--

Written by Chris Ciaccia in New York

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