NDS presents new features for spoof Japanese betting show in U.K.

Underwear fishing and kitchen conkers come to a screen near you
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Banzai, the spoof Japanese betting show aired in the U.K. is back with new features developed by NDS (Nasdaq/Nasdaq Europe: NNDS), a News Corporation (NYSE: NWS, NWS.A) developer of interactive applications.

Unlike other interactive programs, Banzai synchronizes content to viewer reactions.

A hit in the first series, viewers are once again "awarded" an on-screen Banzai Belt, along with an insult or a compliment depending on their score: "Stupidity has your name on its Christmas card list" or "Glory and honor know your name, and would like to go out for a drink with you".

With interactivity giving content providers a revenue-generation opportunity, there will also be competitions, with viewers on Sky digital having the chance to become the "Banzai Grandmaster", with the prize - a trip to Japan - awarded to the highest score over the series. A tiebreak question must be answered to enter both competitions.

Produced by Radar TV for Channel 4, the comedy betting sensation continues to give viewers the chance to enjoy playing along by guessing the outcome of the surreal and comic scenarios.

Additional games for the new series include Play Your Bras Right, where contestants guess the bra sizes of pedestrians on the street.

NDS developed both the new and the original Banzai application on the digital satellite platform, and the interactive TV graphics, using its experience in developing interactive applications for many broadcasters and channels including Sky, Discovery Channel, QVC and, most recently, Nickelodeon.

"Banzai proved a huge cross-platform success first time round and for series two we have developed the interactive TV concept even further. NDS's experience has given us the opportunity to find the grandmaster, the ultimate Banzai fan - there can be only one," commented Peter Good, Head of Enhanced Television, Channel 4.

NDS was established in 1988 as an Israeli startup based on technology developed by Professor Adi Shamir of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Two years later Murdoch News Corp (NYSE:NWS, NWS.A) bought 80% of the company, which went public at the end of 1999.