Not so fast.

Just one day after

Microsoft

(MSFT) - Get Report

and the government appeared near a settlement in the antitrust suit against the software behemoth, government attorneys deemed Microsoft's proposal inadequate, according to

The New York Times

.

The newspaper

reported on its

Web site Saturday that Microsoft faxed a proposal to the government and the 19 attorneys general who are suing the company. But after digging through the technical information for hours, the government officials decided "it wasn't nearly enough."

Attempts by

TSC

to reach officials from Microsoft and the

TheStreet Recommends

Justice Department

were unsuccessful Saturday.

On

Friday, several news organizations reported that talks between the two sides were heating up after the judge in the case,

Thomas Jackson

, threatened to make a final ruling on Tuesday if Microsoft and the government didn't show progress toward a settlement. Jackson had issued a scathing description of Microsoft's business activities in his findings of facts in the case, saying the company had used its monopoly power with the

Windows

operating system to stifle its competition. The harsh words left little doubt that Jackson would rule against the company if a settlement couldn't be reached.

Under the mounting threat of such a ruling, Microsoft reportedly indicated earlier this week that it would be willing to accept some restrictions on its business to reach a settlement.

Dow Jones Newswires

reported, for instance, that the company offered to separate its Internet browser software from its Windows operating systems software.

The

Times

reported Saturday, however, that two officials said no new talks had been scheduled.