Infoseek, Corel, Computer Management Sciences and Novell

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A selection of some of the most intriguing tech stock ideas on the Web. The items presented do not represent the views of

TheStreet.com

; rather, the collection is offered as a service to our members who may be scanning the Web for stock-related information.

Infoseek

Internet World

There's room for one more. That's the attitude of

Merrill Lynch

analyst Bruce Smith, who calls shares of

Infoseek

(

(SEEK)

SEEK) "grossly undervalued" in an

Internet World

article. Infoseek's market capitalization is fourth largest in the search-engine category, companies that offer Net users a guide for navigating online resources. Even though many analysts look for the company to break even in the fourth quarter, the shares get little respect.

Smith says the pundits who say search-engine goliaths

Yahoo!

(

(YHOO)

YHOO) and

Excite

(

(XCIT)

XCIT) will own the market are shortsighted. "When a market is going through hypergrowth, all participants benefit," he said. "And I don't think we're anywhere near maxing out the growth of people connecting to the Internet."

About two weeks ago, Infoseek sold more stock and raised $40 million cash. Some speculate the money will be used to make acquisitions to further expand Infoseek's offerings and traffic builders, such as adding a site that provides free email and personal Web pages.

Volpe Brown Whelan

analyst Andrea Williams believes Infoseek has the cash at the right time to give it "the luxury of investing further in the service. It's cheaper to do that today, because as brands get more established, it becomes more costly."

More information can be found at:

www.iw.com

Corel

TechInvestor

It can't get much worse for

Corel Software

(

(COSFF)

COSFF) if you listen to some analysts. Even under optimistic scenarios, they see the Canadian software company only breaking even. If sales come in less than $80 million, something the manager of a Canadian technology fund calls "very much possible," the company will be out of money in six months.

Corel dazzled the technology world a few years ago. It bought

Novell's

(

(NOVL)

NOVL) WordPerfect and launched an aggressive effort to displace

Microsoft

(

(MSFT) - Get Report

MSFT) from the nation's offices. Instead, after 14 months of development and money being poured into a Java-language office suite, Corel deep-sixed the project.

Then it announced a move into Java hardware. "That sent a mixed message," said Joe Vejvoda, an analyst with

Loewen Ondaatje McCutcheon

in Toronto. "It's very confusing as to what the actual company strategy is." Corel CEO Michael Cowpland presents the company's position as "strong and well-positioned for a successful 1998." But

Navigator Canadian Technology

fund manager Duncan Stewart disagrees and warns bargain-hunters to beware.

More information can be found at:

www.techweb.com

Computer Management Sciences

Standard & Poor's

Computer Management Sciences

(

(CMSX)

CMSX) is a high-tech consulting firm that develops custom software, does systems integration and refines business practices. Think of it as a very high-priced temp agency, because those are essentially the services it provides: high-priced, high-quality technology consultants.

Standard & Poor's

analysts say the focus on fixed-bid contracts, acquisitions and new offices is paying off through rising profitability. S&P does not see demand for CMSX's services declining anytime soon, either. Shares are trading at a 1998 price-to-earnings ratio of 33 and a 1999 P/E of 26.

More information can be found at:

www.businessweek.com

Novell

Steve Harmon

Novell

(

(NOVL)

NOVL) seems to have the right stuff, but doesn't get much credit. What's wrong?

Mecklermedia

senior stock analyst Steve Harmon suggests the company could use some expertise in marketing, along with such basics as sales and profits, too.

Leadership is, however, not an area where the company is lacking -- and maybe that's reason enough to consider the shares. Chairman Eric Schmidt, technology chief at

Sun Microsystems

(

(SUNW) - Get Report

SUNW), joined Novell about a year ago and has been making changes, pushing the company to open networking software to work more compatibly with the Internet. Schmidt is orienting the company to offer businesses one-stop, one-click, easy-to-manage intranets.

But it hasn't clicked with investors. "Novell just doesn't seem to get the kind of respect on Wall Street that rivals with one-tenth the products and one-one-hundredth of the experience receive," he laments.

More information can be found at:

www.internetnews.com