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NEW YORK (

TheStreet

) --At

Apple's

(AAPL) - Get Apple Inc. Report

World Wide Developers' Conference Monday, CEO Steve Jobs unveiled the company's long-awaited iCloud, a service lets users play their music and access their data from any Apple device.

iCloud's announcement comes as the tech industry shifts from a focus on storing data on hardware to the cloud, where it is kept on the Internet.

"We're going to demote the PC and the Mac to just be a device," Jobs said. "We're going to move the digital hub, the center of your digital life, into the cloud."

iCloud replaces Apple's MobileMe service, its paid service for synchronizing personal information across various devices that was largely panned by tech observers.

The service will offer all of MobileMe's features, as well as the ability to share and backup books, music and data -- like calendars and contacts -- across Apple products.

With iCloud, Apple is trying to catch up with rivals like

Google

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and

Amazon

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, which have already deployed cloud-based services.

While Apple's iCloud has been hotly anticipated, recent

high-profile hacking incidents

at

Sony

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have shed light on the importance of corporate security and have

some questioning the security of cloud-based offerings

.

"I think Apple will have to do something to assure their customers that everything is safe and sound on the cloud," said a commenter

on TheStreet's live blog of the conference

keynote.

Apple also previewed iOS 5, the newest version of its mobile operating system. The system includes iMessage, a new messaging service similar to

Research In Motion's

(RIMM)

BlackBerry Messenger, in which users can send texts, videos and photos between all iOS devices. iOS 5 also includes deeper

Twitter

integration and Newstand, a way for users to manage their newspaper and magazine subscriptions.

Lion, Apple's new operating system for Macs, will be available in July for $30, the company said. It includes features like gesture technology, the ability to view full-screen apps and Mission Control, a way to organize and view documents.

--Written by Olivia Oran in New York.

>To follow the writer on Twitter, go to

http://twitter.com/Ozoran

.

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