Apple iPhone 4: Weekly Tech Recap - TheStreet

Apple iPhone 4: Weekly Tech Recap

Here's a roundup of TheStreet's top tech stories for the week.
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With an update on the Apple iPhone 4 antenna problems, here's a roundup of TheStreet's top technology news for this week.

NEW YORK (

TheStreet

) -- Smartphones were again driving the tech news agenda this week, with

Apple's

(AAPL) - Get Report

eagerly-anticipated iPhone 4 finally hitting the shelves.

Late yesterday,

Apple acknowledged that the way users hold the new iPhone 4 could hinder the device's reception

. iPhone 4 supply was so low that people who didn't pre-order saw

empty shelves at places like Best Buy (BBY) - Get Report

, and Apple also announced that the elusive

white iPhone

won't ship until late July.

Apple shares are trading down, dipping 0.50% to $267.69 today.

A new iPhone 4 changes hands at an Apple store

As the Nasdaq crept up 0.05% on Friday,

Research In Motion

(RIMM)

was one of tech's biggest losers, declining almost 10% to $53. Late Thursday, the company released mixed first-quarter results and outlook, which prompted much of Wall Street to

cut RIM's target price

. Analysts -- and consumers -- are awaiting new touchscreen revelations from RIM, whose innovation has failed to keep up with that from rivals Apple and

Google's

(GOOG) - Get Report

Android partners.

On Wednesday,

Verizon

(VZ) - Get Report

and

Motorola

(MOT)

launched the

Droid X

, Motorola's latest effort to gain some of the smartphone traction it has lost. The Droid X, which should hit the market later this summer, features a large 4.4-inch touchscreen, an 8-megapixel camera and SWYPE -- a faster, more precise keyboard input technology.

As a result of all the iPhone and Android-related news,

Microsoft

(MSFT) - Get Report

and its

Windows Phone 7

got some unsympathetic attention for its lack of contention in the smartphone war. After

TheStreet

ran a

video questioning whether or not the upcoming Windows phones will be revolutionary

enough to boost Microsoft's stature,

the company wrote us a letter

, noting that it is "well positioned for success."

Microsoft also faces a refreshed fight against

Dell

(DELL) - Get Report

, which is talking with Google to

run its open-source operating system, Chrome, on Dell laptops.

Just as Google's popular Android OS is experiencing success on smartphones, Chrome is expected to do the same on laptops and netbooks. The OS, which runs on top of the Linux kernel, is a direct

challenge

to Microsoft's dominance in the PC market.

Microsoft was down 0.40% to $24.90.

Oracle

(ORCL) - Get Report

is confounding the critics who said that its

Sun

acquisition was a bad move. The database giant

beat analysts' estimates in its fourth-quarter results on Thursday,

thanks in part to a revitalized Sun.

In Oracle's first full quarter of Sun revenue, sales of system hardware brought in $1.2 billion. The new acquisition also contributed more than $400 million to Oracle's fourth-quarter operating income. Oracle, which took the opportunity to bash

IBM

(IBM) - Get Report

and

SAP

(SAP) - Get Report

during its fourth-quarter conference call, also says the pipeline of deals for its Exadata database appliance is approaching $1 billion.

Oracle shares were rising 4.23% to $22.98 on Friday.

Tech's week ahead

On Tuesday evening, smartphone laggard

Samsung

plans to formally unveil a model or two of its Galaxy S family.

PCMag.com

reports that Samsung's new Vibrant phone will run on Android 2.1 and will feature Samsung's own 1-Gigaherz Hummingbird processor.

Also on Tuesday,

TheStreet's

tech team will give a midyear update for its top tech stocks for 2010.

--Written by James Rogers in New York

Follow James Rogers on

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and get more stock ideas and investing advice on our sister site,

Stockpickr.com.