It hasn't been a great several weeks for Apple's (AAPL - Get Report) reputation for protecting users' privacy.

First there was the Group FaceTime bug that allowed users to eavesdrop on another user even if that user hadn't answered the call. Apple was made aware of the bug for some time, but only responded to it last week after news of it went viral on social media, shutting down Group FaceTime while it worked on a patch. That patch was released on Thursday in for the form of an iOS software update.

But in its software notes accompanying the update, Apple also noted that there was a previously unknown issue with Live Photos in FaceTime that it also fixed, without giving details on the problem. Apple simply noted that "the issue was addressed with improved validation on the FaceTime server" and had been discovered via a "thorough security audit of the FaceTime service."

On top of that, Apple has had to threaten software developers to remove their apps from the App Store if they record users actions without their express permission, an issue that Tech Crunch exposed this week. In their investigation, Tech Crunch found that apps from major firms such as Expedia, Air Canada and Hollister were recording users' every move within their apps via a third party tool, without disclosing to users that they were doing this.

The tech giant has made a point about the lengths it goes to protect user privacy and data, differentiating itself from other tech giants like Facebook and Google that profit from user data. 

Apple shares ended Friday up 20 cents, or 0.12%, at $170.41.

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