Updated with Omniture's closing price

NEW YORK, (

TheStreet

) -- Attraction or desperation, whatever the motive, the Internet sector has played host to a few mergers lately, and some see more ahead.

Adobe's

(ADBE) - Get Report

surprise $1.8 billion bid for

Omniture

( OMTR) Tuesday highlights some of the more urgent pressures at work.

With the

relentless decline in sales

, the software developer pondered its options and decided to realign its strategy a little more toward Web services.

With cash available, and so many beaten-down players to chose from, mergers and acquisitions could catch on.

There have been signs this summer with deals like

Nokia's

(NOK) - Get Report

pickup of social networker

Plum

,

Amazon's

(AMZN) - Get Report

acquisition of shoe retailer

Zappos

, and private equity firm

Apax

' offer to buy

Bankrate

(RATE)

.

"We believe that Internet M&A activity has been picking-up and we will likely see more acquisitions in coming months," wrote Collins Stewart analyst Sandeep Aggarwal in a research note Wednesday.

Picking up the Pieces at Adobe: 1 Minute Trade

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As analysts scrambled to adjust their ratings and price targets on Omniture after the 25% premium bid from Adobe, many offered other names to the potential merger pool. Leading candidates include a counter offer for Omniture from

Yahoo!

(YHOO)

or

Microsoft

(MSFT) - Get Report

. Or takeover targets like online marketing shop

ValueClick

(VCLK)

or rival traffic meter readers like

Unica

(UNCA)

,

ComScore

(SCOR) - Get Report

jump to mind.

Companies like Omniture, with industry leading technologies or services stuck in a sales slump, may be a good example of what sells in this environment.

After a strong surge in 2007, Omniture isn't exactly growing like gangbusters anymore. The company sells analytical services that measure traffic patterns on Web sites, particularly page views. These click counts are the life blood of any online venture that hopes to convince advertisers there is an audience for their ads.

Like many companies, Omniture hit a wall a year ago as the financial crisis took hold. The Orem, Utah Web monitoring shop has been unable to add to its customer list, leaving it with the challenge of squeezing more cash out of its current clients.

"We've seen the majority of our sales come from existing customers the last three quarters," Omniture CFO Mike Herring told analysts on a July earnings conference call.

But what works best in Omniture's favor is that it competes with

Google

(GOOG) - Get Report

Analytics.

That fact alone might compel Microsoft or Yahoo! to make competing overtures to Omniture.

Omniture shares closed Wednesday trading up 26.3% at $21.88.