On Tuesday, the day that Spotify Technology (SPOT - Get Report) began trading on the New York Stock Exchange - opening at $165.90, markets were higher but trading fluctuated after Monday's selloff which was highlighted by the significant decline in technology stocks, and President Trump pressed his attack against Amazon.

Here are three top takes from the columnists of Real Money and Real Money Pro, our premium site for active investors.

Why the Market Collapsed Monday and What's Next

Doug Kass, a Real Money Pro columnist and author of "Doug's Daily Diary", writes that "Investment vision (and wisdom) is always 20/20 when seen in the rear view mirror. It's easy to explain Monday's market drop and the decline since late January, 2018 which turned optimism into pessimism."

The reality, says Kass, is that "the causalities are multiple and complex - not a function of one or two factors." He offers 19 reasons for the market's recent fall from grace.

Why Gun-Shy Market Bulls Can't Pull the Trigger Like They Used To

"It is pretty obvious that the bulls are gun shy at this point," observes Real Money columnist James "Rev Shark" DePorre. "They are not trusting that this market has seen its lows, which is a definite change in character."

DePorre looks at the FANG names - Facebook (FB - Get Report) , Amazon (AMZN - Get Report) , Netflix (NFLX - Get Report) , Alphabet (GOOGL - Get Report)  - as a "good illustration of how difficult dip buying has become."

(Facebook, Amazon and Alphabet are Action Alerts PLUS holdings, which Jim Cramer co-manages as a charitable trust.)

How the Stock Market's Bleeding Could Be Stopped

Stephen Guilfolye, a Real Money columnist, says, "We've come to the point where stocks are seeing the repricing of forward earnings multiples. Both investor sentiment and momentum have turned from friend to enemy thanks to a number of forces negatively impacting price discovery."

Guilfoyle's bottom line? "Uncertainty will certainly reign for the time being, and the only reasonable way for stocks to react is to reduce their forward-looking multiples."