The market acted like a coiled spring today, striking back, Jim Cramer told his Mad Money viewers Thursday. 

Or, you might say, the FANG stocks (Cramer's acronym for Facebook (FB) , Amazon (AMZN) , Netflix (NFLX) and Alphabet/Google  (GOOGL) ) were striking back, like a coiled snake.

Nowhere was the FANG strike more evident than in Amazon, which had lost 120 points over two days after reports that President Trump dislikes the company. Thursday, the White House told us Trump is not targeting Amazon, news that allowed the stock to rally 1.11%.

Hopefully, the positive action will continue next week, Cramer said, but if not, investors have his blessing to do some selling.

Cramer said his game plan for next week will start on Monday with all eyes once again on Facebook. With little other news expected Monday, Facebook will be an easy target for more criticism.

Tuesday brings earnings from Cloudera (CLDR) , the big data analytics company, which should provide a read on the hottest tech trends, including artificial intelligence.

Next, on Wednesday, Cramer said he'll get a good read on the U.S. economy from Carmax (KMX) , the nation's largest used car seller, and Lennar (LEN) , one of our largest home builders. Cramer also expects great earnings from Ollie's Bargain Outlet (OLLI) when it reports on Wednesday.

For Thursday, Cramer wants to hear from Monsanto (MON) to find out if they're worried about agriculture tariffs from China and elsewhere.

Finally, on Friday, it's the latest non-farm payroll report, which is becoming a hot-button data point for the markets.

Cramer and the AAP team say that the steel fundamentals are good news for Nucor (NUE) . Find out what they're telling their investment club members and get in on the conversation with a free trial subscription to Action Alerts PLUS.

Executive Decision: Nvidia

In a special "Executive Decision" segment, Cramer spoke with Jensen Huang, the founder, president and CEO of Nvidia (NVDA) , the GPU computing company with shares that have soared 1,700% over the past five years.

Huang spoke from the GPU Technology Conference in Silicon Valley, a gathering of over 8,500 scientists, researchers and creative professionals that want to see the latest in GPU computing. Nvidia showed off its latest graphics and gaming chips at the conference, chips that are twice the performance of their chips from just six months ago. Huang said these new chips can provide cinematic renderings in real time.

But graphics and gaming is only one of four growth drivers for the company, Huang said. Nvidia is not just a chipmaker, but rather a technology company that offers platforms, software, hardware and solutions.

Their latest data center offerings replace 300 servers that would have cost millions of dollars, with one desktop-size box that costs just $399,000. The savings in time, money, floor space and energy are staggering. Nvidia's new computers can provide more performance by using just 6,000 watts of power, versus the old servers at over 160,000 watts of power.

Researchers can use these new systems to train machine learning 500 times faster than they could just five years ago, Huang added. 

Cramer asked Huang about the March 18 collision involving an Uber self-driving vehicle, in which a pedestrian was killed. Huang said the accident was tragic and the entire industry is taking a pause to learn from it.

While Uber uses some of Nvidia's hardware in their vehicles, Huang stressed that Uber's sensing and processing systems are different from what Nvidia is developing.

Huang explained that, worldwide, drivers clock more than 10 trillion miles a year. At best, it takes any one company several years to test their vehicles on just a million miles. That's why Nvidia is working on a virtual reality simulator that can train cars how to be safer, orders of magnitude faster.

When asked "Who are you?", Huang said that he's the product of his father's dreams and his mother's aspirations, having immigrated to the U.S. after being taught English by his mother.

March Madness for Stocks

March has proven to be a month of madness for a host of stocks, Cramer told viewers, but nowhere is that more evident than with chipmaker Micron Technology Inc.  (MU) . The stock has been loaded with "hot money" --  the weak-handed, short-term investors that are the bane of the more level-headed, long-term crowd.

What does hot money look like? Cramer explained that in the 19 days leading up to the company's earnings, shares of Micron soared from $47 a share to $61 a share as the hot-money investors imagined a huge surge towards $100. After the company reported a blowout quarter, shares sank to $58, the hot money quickly did an about-face and within days shares fell back to $52 a share.

Cramer said the action in Micron was utter madness. Is there anyone who would pay $61 for Micron after a huge run up like that? Is there anything the company could have done better? Not likely, in either case.

For those who take a long-term view of Micron, the case remains solid. DRAM is not the commodity of old and Micron is the clear leader in the space. With high barriers to entry, there likely won't be a sudden influx of competition, either. But for now, investors need to wait for the hot money to flush out before shares finally find their footing again.

Executive Decision: Constellation Brands

In his second "Executive Decision" segment, Cramer also checked back in with Rob Sands, president and CEO of Constellation Brands (STZ) , the spirits maker that just posted a 15-cents-a-share earnings beat with strong revenues and guidance that sent shares higher by 3.4%.

When asked what's driving the company's success, Sands said simply that Constellation has the best portfolio of brands in the alcohol industry with names like Corona, Modello and Pacifico. Constellation has bought back $1 billion worth of their stock over the past year and has returned a total of $1.4 billion to shareholders when you add in the dividend.

In October, Constellation announced a 9.9% stake in the Canadian-based Canopy Growth Company, a move Sands called strategic, as they explore the possibility of cannabis-based beverages in areas where cannabis is legal. That investment has also proved to be a great one in a financial sense as well.

Turning to the topic of tariffs, specifically on aluminum, Sands said he's pleased to report that it's immaterial for Constellation, as they don't buy a lot of aluminum in the U.S. and cans represent a small fraction of their business overall. 

Lightning Round

In the Lightning Round, Cramer was bullish on Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) , Intel (INTC) , DexCom (DXCM) and PayPal (PYPL) .

Cramer was bearish on CVS Health (CVS) .

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At the time of publication, Cramer's Action Alerts PLUS had a position in NUE, STZ, NVDA, AMZN, FB, GOOGL, PYPL.

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