Love may be blind, but it isn't free, at least not around Valentine's Day.

The good news, however, is that inflation for the gifts most people buy at Valentine's Day has been low, according to LPL Research.

Researchers found that Valentine's Day inflation has increased by 0.9% over the previous year. That was slower than average for the past 15 years, as well as below the December 2017 readings for headline (2.1%) and core (1.8%) CPI.

The study found that costlier gifts, such as jewelry and trips, rose less in price than more traditional presents, such as a night on the town.

This year's Valentine's Day also includes the latest CPI data, which could give investors renewed hope, if it's lower than expected, because that would reduce pressure on the Federal Reserve to raise interest rates to counter inflation.

Currently analysts are expecting inflation of 2% year over year, according to Bloomberg data. Core inflation, excluding volatile food and energy prices, is expected to rise 1.7% year over year.

TheStreet's Kinsey Grant explains why you should buy your sweetheart stocks for Valentine's Day. 

Employees of TheStreet are restricted from owning individual equities.

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