Markets finished the day up big as the bullish sentiment returned after a week that saw the Dow, S&P 500 and Nasdaq each shed over 5% of their value.

Amid the return to positive territory for the major indexes, some moves seemed particularly peculiar given the fact that risks of inflation and rising rates haven't gone anywhere.

TheStreet's founder Jim Cramer points to "the highest multiple stocks" in Workday (WDAY)  , Salesforce (CRM)  , VMWare (VMW)  , Adobe Systems (ADBE) , which all traded higher Monday for one reason or another.

"Why is this crazy?" asks Cramer. "Because if rates are really about to soar and inflation about to roar these are the stocks that should be hammered unmercifully."

Cramer says the moves are a sign of more unrelenting bullish sentiment from Wall Street. But not so fast, he cautions, as the markets are still fragile despite the upward moves Monday.

In fact, caution seemed to be a pervasive theme Monday, as a number of deals were put into purgatory even as market turmoil subsided.

Starboard Value's Jeff Smith escalated his total board takeover effort at Newell Brands (NWL)  on Monday, Feb. 12, with a letter "strongly" urging the maker of Rubbermaid containers, Mr. Coffee machines and Elmer's glue to table all major divestiture decisions until after shareholders had a chance to vote on the company's directors.

At the same time, Coatue Management, the technology-focused investment company known for bets on Didi Chuxing and Snap Inc. (SNAP)  has agreed to lead the latest funding round for Instacart. The deal values the target at more than $4 billion and seemingly puts the kibosh on any ideas from would-be acquirers such as Amazon (AMZN)  or Alibaba (BABA)  as the grocer delivery service seems destined to go public.

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Photo of the day: Remington aims for bankruptcy

Gunmaker Remington Outdoor is headed for Chapter 11 after reaching a deal with lenders and noteholders. Backed by private equity firm Cerberus, Remington said Monday, Feb. 12, it would file for protection in Wilmington, Del. Remington did not indicate the timing for the filing or a projected completion of the restructuring. The filing doesn't exactly indicate the downfall of the firearms industry -- Remington said sales remain strong -- but more of a tale of a company taking on too much leverage. The 202-year-old gun and ammunition maker said it would "emerge from this process with a deleveraged balance sheet and ample liquidity, positioning Remington to compete more aggressively and to seize future growth opportunities." Founded in 1816, Remington is the oldest gunmaker in the U.S. It supplies weapons and ammunition to citizens and the military under the Remington, Bushmaster, Marlin, H&R, Tapco, Dakota Arms, Panther Arms and Parker brands, among others. Read more

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