Wow. 

The Dow Jones Industrial Average cratered as much 1,500 points on Monday amid a confluence of factors. From rising bond yields to now former Fed chair Janet Yellen voicing concern on stock valuations, investors have found new reasons to sell stocks first and ask questions later. Mixed earnings from big-cap tech names such as Apple (AAPL) and Alphabet (GOOGL) haven't helped market sentiment, either. 

At its worst point in Monday's session, the Dow had shed an eye-popping 2,200 points over the last two sessions. 

Many investors are probably wondering several things at this precise moment. One, does Monday represent the near-term market bottom? And if not, how much is left to the downside? If the bottom is finally in, which stocks are the best ones to buy?

While shell-shocked investors attempt to decide a path forward, TheStreet's founder and Action Alerts Plus portfolio manager Jim Cramer has some legendary reads to digest immediately. Although the market looks weak currently, it will come back -- in fact a snap-back rally this week shouldn't be ruled out. Cramer's reads on investing are immensely helpful when down seems like up and up seems like down right now in the market. 

10 Commandments for Investing

25 Rules for Investing

Get the latest thinking on markets from Jim Cramer and his Action Alerts Plus research team here.

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