Thursday's busy day of tech earnings may have distracted investors from another lackluster quarter at shipping company United Parcel Service (UPS)  .

In the world of the on-demand economy where Amazon (AMZN)  is dominant, a company like UPS, you'd think, would be killing it. But when you take a deeper look things don't seem so rosy.

Sure, the company's 762 million deliveries during the peak season were the most ever recorded by the company. The stock however, fell more than 6% on Thursday.

The logic? UPS stays grounded because not enough of that delivery revenue is reaching its bottom line. Increased costs and a reduction to its 2018 earnings outlook based on those increased costs should give investors some pause.

At the same time, the case could be made that UPS may soon find itself pressured to do another deal or to take steps to improve its bottom line after another lackluster quarter. TheStreet's executive editor Brian Sozzi and I take a look at this possibility over on The Deal.

From one overlooked stock to another, as Jim Collins over on our premium site for traders talks about oil stocks.

The group, including tankers and oil and gas exploration and production companies, has just been absolutely creamed in the past two weeks, and if you were busy watching Amazon and Facebook (FB)  instead, you may have missed the carnage.

Range Resources (RRC)  and Southwestern Energy (SWN) , two natural gas E&Ps, are in Collins' crosshairs right now, though if you're wondering what the next trade is with those two names, you'll have to head over to Real Money and find out more.

I will save some of the big tech earnings chatter for tomorrow but today I'll get into a little bit of Apple (AAPL)  news.

A dispute with Apple and trends in China's smartphone market are weighing down Qualcomm's expectations for the second quarter. The timing could be better, as Broadcom is waging a hostile takeover offer and Elliott Management contests Qualcomm's (QCOM)  bid for NXP Semiconductor (NXPI) .

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Photo of the day: A new course for eBay

It's been a long time since Pierre Omidyar started AuctionWeb, the predecessor of eBay (EBAY) and began selling broken laser pointers. After renaming the company eBay, bringing in about 30 employees, including former Walt Disney (DIS) and Hasbro (HAS) executive Meg Whitman, the company began to take off, hosting tons of auctions for its growing user base. In 2002 the company acquired Peter Thiel-funded PayPal (PYPL) and the rest is history. Well, sort of. Ebay and PayPal announced that the two are parting ways and that PayPal will no longer be the default payment processor for its auctions and sales. Ebay closed up 14% while PayPal closed down more than 8%. Going forward, eBay will use Ayden, a German company recently valued at more than $2 billion. Omidyar and Whitman are pictured above in 1998. Read More

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