Ask us anything: We're getting questions from readers about the new tax law. While there's a lot still to be learned about the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, people are asking about changes to the retirement savings credit, property taxes and more. No matter your question, we've got answers from some of the nation's top tax and financial planning experts. So don't be shy. Send your questions about the new tax law to Robert.Powell@TheStreet.com. We'll try to answer and publish as many as we can about how it's going to affect your investments, retirement savings and taxes.

Editor's note: The following questions were answered by Tyler Mickey, CPA, a senior manager at Moss Adams and a member of the American Institute of CPAs Personal Financial Specialist Credential Committee.

Question: Regarding the new tax law, did it impact foreign tax credits? We have a vacation rental abroad and we can typically deduct any taxes we pay for income generated in that country. Will this still apply?

Answer: I haven't seen any information regarding new limitations on this and I believe this is separate than the $10,000 state tax limit. While there are a number of changes related to the international tax provisions, the ability to deduct foreign income taxes in lieu of taking the foreign tax credit was not changed by the $10,000 limitation for deducting state and local taxes. Non-U.S. property taxes were also specifically excluded from the $10,000 limitation.

Question: Has the new tax law done away with stretch required minimum distributions (RMDs) in regard to distributions to other than the surviving spouse?

Answer: No. There were proposed changes in one version of the tax bill, but the final law does not impact the ability to utilize a stretch RMD (required minimum distribution) to non-surviving spouse beneficiaries.

Question: I retired in 2017 and incurred more than $1,000 travel expenses (airline travel, rental vehicle, and hotel) while traveling from my home to serve as a volunteer at a nonprofit. The expenses were directly related to volunteer work with no personal side trips or recreation. I intend to do that again in 2018. Per IRS Publication 526, it appears I can claim those out-of-pocket expenses as a charitable deduction at least for 2017. Is that correct? If so, what IRS form should I file? Is there any change in 2018 under new tax law?

Answer: Yes, you should be able to deduct the expenses in both 2017 and 2018 (assuming you are otherwise itemizing your deductions and not taking the standard deduction). You must have records to prove the amount of the expense and you will need a letter from the qualified organization conforming to the IRS requirements which can be found in Publication 526. For 2017 your out-of-pockets charitable expenses are reported on Schedule A (Form 1040), line 16. Beginning with the 2018 tax year the limitation on the current deductibility of certain charitable gifts (primarily cash) has been raised from 50% to 60% of Adjusted Gross Income.

Question: Regarding the new tax law, did it impact foreign tax credits? We have a vacation rental abroad and we can typically deduct any taxes we pay for income generated in that country. Will this still apply?

Answer: I haven't seen any information regarding new limitations on this and I believe this is separate than the $10,000 state tax limit. While there are a number of changes related to the international tax provisions, the ability to deduct foreign income taxes in lieu of taking the foreign tax credit was not changed by the $10,000 limitation for deducting state and local taxes. Non-US property taxes were also specifically excluded from the $10,000 limitation.

Question: Under the new law, are property taxes on investment properties considered an expense and not subject to the $10,000 state and local tax limit?

Answer: Correct, the new law specifically carves out property taxes on investment property from the $10,000 limit. However, other expenses related to holding property for investment (excluding interest) where eliminated with the suspension of miscellaneous itemized deductions for tax years 2018 through 2025.

Question: Will direct charitable contributions to qualified charities from IRAs still be able to be counted as part of the RMD, but not as a taxable distribution?

Answer: This is correct. An individual can still offset up to $100,000 of their annual RMD (required minimum distribution) by having the funds transferred directly by the IRA Custodian to a qualified charity or charities. With the significant increase in the standard deduction and limitation and elimination of other deductions beginning in 2018, this option may now make sense for more taxpayers.

Got questions about the new tax law? Email Robert.Powell@TheStreet.com.

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