Obamacare doesn't have a lot of fans on either side of the aisle, but there are portions of the health care law that Americans love.

The Affordable Care Act (ACA), most commonly referred to as Obamacare, hasn't won either friends or enemies since President Trump was elected in November. A study by insurance pricing and analysis site InsuranceQuotes finds that 53% of Americans feel the same about Obamacare now as they did before the 2016 election.

An almost equal number of Republicans, Democrats and Independents said health care reform should take priority for Trump and Congress (38%), ahead of tax code reform (20%), improving national security (18%) and changing immigration laws (14%). Of the 38% who want health care reform to be a top priority, their party affiliation is split nearly evenly among Democrats (38%), Republicans (34%) and independents (39%) and among those with children (37%) and those without (39%).

While 31% believe Obamacare will be repealed and replaced, a whopping 51% believe it will either be updated or stay the same as it is today. So why the preference for tinkering with the ACA instead of overhauling it? Because there are many parts of it that people actually like. Overall, people seem just fine with the federal government providing financial assistance to low-income Americans so they can afford health insurance (78%) allowing states to offer health insurance through Medicaid to more low-income people (79%) and allowing young adults to stay on their parents' health insurance plans until age 26 (78%). Americans are emphatically supportive of Obamacare's requirement that health insurance companies cover people with pre-existing conditions (87%).

So what don't they like about it? The individual mandate that requires you to buy insurance or pay a fine. Roughly 57% of all Americans would love to see that requirement go, but they aren't exactly in love with the bureaucracy attached to Obamacare, either. Three years ago, 82% of Americans who shopped for health insurance through Obamacare exchanges said that it was just as bad as or even worse than doing their own taxes. Some 75% said it was the same or worse than getting the middle seat on a crowded airplane. Meanwhile, 23% of those who shopped for a plan said it was less enjoyable than facing the dentist's drill and 45% said it was just as bad.

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"Shopping for health insurance can be complicated, but it's one of the most important decisions you can make," said Doug Whiteman, Bankrate.com insurance analyst. "It's much better to go through the pain of researching and choosing a plan now than it is to figure out how you're going to pay for an unexpected hospital visit during an emergency."

However, that didn't prevent Americans during President Obama's administration from having reservations about their health insurance. Roughly 32% of Americans told Bankrate.com they felt "more negative" now than they did a year ago about the Affordable Care Act's impact on their own health care. That was more than double the 15% who felt "more positive." In 2014, almost half (49%) of Americans wanted major or minor changes to be made to Obamacare. However, only 26% wanted to repeal the law completely and only 16% wanted to keep the law as-is.

Yet there's support for Obamacare among the demographic that may matter most: Millennials. Though younger Millennials (age 18-26) are least likely to believe health care reform a priority (33%) when compared with older Millennials (37%), Gen X-ers (35%) and Baby Boomers (42%). Millennials as a whole are most likely to favor the federal government providing financial assistance to low-income Americans so they can afford health insurance (84%). They are also the most likely to want young adults to stay on their parents' health insurance plans until age 26 (81%). and most likely to want states to offer health insurance through Medicaid to more low-income people (87%).

They also have the most to lose if the Trump administration goes through with its threats to let Obamacare implode. The Congressional Budget Office and the Joint Committee on Taxation just announced that a termination of subsidies to insurance companies under Obamacare would result in a 20% increase in premiums for major health plans in 2018 (25% or higher by 2020) and an increase in the federal budget deficit of $194 billion in the next decade. Even if the administration relent, insurers and health plan administrators are staring down a 40% excise tax if they allow premiums to exceeding a certain amount by 2018. They're also required to cover preventative care and checkups without co-payments.

For now, Obamacare remains the law and its open enrollment period is fast approaching. Even as the debate over its merits continues, the threat of its most onerous requirement still lingers for many U.S. workers.

"Health care remains a top priority and Obamacare is still popular with many Americans, especially young people," said Laura Adams, senior insurance analyst, insuranceQuotes. "Since the ACA is still law, uninsured consumers should shop for a health plan during open enrollment, which starts November 1."

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Editors' pick: Originally published Sept. 21.

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