It's hard to be disciplined when discipline costs you money, Jim Cramer admitted to his Mad Money viewers Tuesday. For weeks now, Cramer has been telling viewers to curb their enthusiasm, but the good news just keeps on coming.

Today's reports that T-Mobile (TMUS) is looking to tie up with rival Sprint (S) would've been unfathomable a few years ago. But with the Trump administration's laissez fair attitude toward regulation and antitrust, it now seems totally plausible. If T-Mobile CEO John Legere remains at the helm, as is rumored, Cramer said it would be a huge win for shareholders beyond today's 5.8% rise in the stock.

Then there's the deal between Post (POST) and Bob Evans Farms (BOBE) , an amazing $1.5 billion deal for a stock that was already up 40% for the year. Add to that yesterday's announcement of Northrop Grumman (NOC) snapping up Orbital ATK (OA) and it's just plain hard not to like the stock market right now.

Cramer said there are certainly problems, not the least of which were poor earnings from Adobe Systems (ADBE) , a hideous quarter from Bed Bath & Beyond (BBBY) and a big miss from FedEx (FDX) . But those issues pale in comparison to all of the money being made by CEOs doing the right things and taking control of their own destinies.

Cramer and the AAP team see a buying opportunity in Allergan (AGN) . Find out what they're telling their investment club members and get in on the conversation with a free trial subscription to Action Alerts PLUS.

Special Guest: Elizabeth Warren 

In a special interview, Cramer spoke with Elizabeth Warren, the Democratic Senator from Massachusetts, about the massive data breach at Equifax (EFX) and the ongoing troubles at Wells Fargo (WFC) .

Warren said she was appalled by the lack of personal responsibility at Equifax, and said CEOs like Richard Smith should face criminal investigation for his role in the company's alleged mishandling the sensitive financial information of up to 143 million Americans.

Warren noted that the information lost by Equifax will be out there forever and could come back to bite consumers for decades.

As for Wells Fargo, Warren said this is not the first time the company has been engaged in fraudulent activity.

During the financial crisis, the company paid fines for predatory loan practices, but then promised it was getting its act together. Then the company engaged in opening fake accounts for customers, and even later, had to restate just how many fake accounts were opened.

Warren said that the Federal Reserve has jurisdiction over the banks and has the authority to remove the bank's board of directors and its executives -- something she has urged them to do. Now's the chance for the Fed to "step up," she said, and show Americans that it will not stand for companies that defraud the public.

Don't Write Retail Off Yet

It's not time yet to totally write off the retail sector, Cramer told viewers. There are at least a few retailers that have been able to stand up and win against Amazon (AMZN) .

Cramer applauded today's news that 85 Kohl's (KSS) locations will begin accepting returns for the ecommerce giant, free of charge. The program may be limited for now, Cramer admitted, but it's a sign of good things to come for Kohl's.

Cramer was also bullish on Children's Place (PLCE) , which has been winning in the children's apparel market by offering many sizes on their shelves, so parents are confident they will walk out with something that fits. He was also upbeat on Gap Stores (GPS) , which received its second upgrade, thanks to smart cost-cutting efforts.

Also on Cramer's buy list were Burlington Stores (BURL) , Ross Stores (ROST) and TJX Companies (TJX) , all of which continue to thrive amid the decline of the department store.

Cramer did give up, however, on Walgreens Boots Alliance (WBA) and CVS Health (CVS) , as Amazon could easily move into prescriptions with its Whole Foods stores. He's also not touching athletic apparel after negative reports from Under Armour (UAA) and Finish Line (FINL) .

Over on Real Money, Cramer looks at more newfound alliances with Amazon and the more aggressive styles of those he thinks are being left behind. Get his insights with a free trial subscription to Real Money. 

Executive Decision: Pitney Bowes

For his "Executive Decision" segment, Cramer again sat down with Marc Lautenbach, president and CEO of Pitney Bowes (PBI) , the mail services giant that's been reinventing itself as a global logistics provider. Shares of Pitney are off 15% in 2017 and declined by 25% in 2016.

Lautenbach said that Pitney Bowes is taking the same core tenet that made it successful in postal services -- removing complexity -- and applying it to today's world, which needs to remove complexity from shipping for ecommerce applications in the cloud. Their core postal business remains strong, he said, and provides the cash flow they need to run their business through this transition.

When asked about his declining share price, Lautenbach explained that many investors expected returns early from this transition, but now most of the hard work is done and they're beginning to see growth in their ecommerce offerings. They needed to make investments into their products and messaging, he said, and those investments were more disruptive than some investors forecasted.

Lautenbach was also upbeat about his company's acquisition of Newgistics, a company with a leadership position in making returns simpler for both companies and their customers.

Executive Decision: Centene Corp.

In his second "Executive Decision" segment, Cramer checked back in with Michael Neidorff, chairman and CEO of Centene (CNC) , the healthcare plan provider that has seen its shares fall from $98 to $89 a share as talks of another Obamacare repeal plan gain steam in Congress.

Neidorff said no matter what happens in Washington, Centene "will do OK." He said they're no stranger to block grants, which is something the latest Congressional plan favors.

As a matter of public policy, however, he said the plan shouldn't pass, as it will create different plans in every state and the states don't want that responsibility. Congress doesn't know what it wants to move toward, Neidorff said, only that it wants to change something.

As for the rest of his industry, Neidorff explained that most providers are very centralized and cannot handle state-level plans. Centene, by contrast, is very decentralized and operates at a local level.

Neidorff also commented on his company's merger with Fidelis, saying the deal will allow Centene to be the largest provider in the four largest states, something that will give them the scale they need for continued success.

Lightning Round

In the Lightning Round, Cramer was bullish on Marathon Petroleum (MPC) , Healthcare Trust of America (HTA) and NXP Semiconductors (NXPI) .

Cramer was bearish on Marathon Oil (MRO) , The Trade Desk (TTD) and CyberArk Software (CYBR) .

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At the time of publication, Cramer's Action Alerts PLUS had a position in AGN, TJX, NXPI.

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