You can't quit, you're fired!

President Trump and the CEOs on his manufacturing council were pitted against each other in a race to see who could end the council first. After Merck & Co. (MRK) CEO Kenneth Frazier stepped down from the council in response to the president's controversial comments about the violence in Charlottesville, other leaders on the council have been bailing out as well.

Among the last to defect was General Electric (GE) CEO Jeff Immelt, who reportedly quit just before Trump tweeted that he was disbanding the council.

GE is a holding in Jim Cramer's Action Alerts PLUS Charitable Trust Portfolio. Want to be alerted before Cramer buys or sells GE? Learn more now.

But bad blood between the White House and some of the nation's biggest companies doesn't seem to be impacting stock prices. That's especially apparent in infrastructure stocks, which have been enjoying a major shot in the arm as investors expect a major push for infrastructure projects from President Trump.

Then again, there is at least one pretty major exception to that rule.

Today, we'll take a closer look at both situations shaping up in three major infrastructure-related stocks -- and how to trade them.

U.S. Steel Corp.

Up first on the list is steel producer U.S. Steel Corp. (X) . U.S. Steel started off 2017 by giving back all of the upside shares had enjoyed following the election. But the primary trend in this stock shifted in mid-May, and shares have been bouncing their way higher in a well-defined uptrend ever since.

Now, U.S. Steel is moving higher in an uptrending channel, a trading setup that defines the high-probability range for shares to stay within. Since bottoming back in May, shares have caught a bid higher at every test of trendline support. In other words, U.S. Steel is a "buy the dips" stock right now.

The 50-day moving average has been a perfect proxy for support since July. That makes it a logical place to park a protective stop below.

Caterpillar Inc.

Caterpillar Inc. (CAT) is another big infrastructure play that's in rally-mode right now. Since mid-July, shares have been consolidating sideways under $115 resistance, forming a great example of an ascending triangle setup. Simply put, a breakout to new 52-week highs at $115 would provide a key buy signal for this heavy machinery stock.

Here again, the 50-day moving average is the risk-management level to watch. If shares violate the 50-day, CAT's breakout setup is broken, and you don't want to own it any more.

General Electric

Last up is General Electric. One of these things is clearly not like the other; and in GE's case, it's the awful chart that's been in play all year long. In other words, GE's underperformance isn't a new phenomenon, and it's not showing any signs of reversing course.

Shares remain stuck in a parabolic downtrend this summer, testing new 52-week lows at the exact same time that the broad market tests new all-time highs. GE is the infrastructure stock to avoid until further notice.

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This article is commentary by an independent contributor. At the time of publication, the author held no positions in the stocks mentioned.

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