Updated from 6:05 a.m. ET on Friday, June 23
 
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Here are five things you must know for Friday, June 23:
 
1. -- U.S. stock futures turned lower on Friday, June 23, European stocks fell and Asian shares finished the session mixed as investors digested an assortment of global data and oil prices stabilized.
 
European stocks traded lower after economic activity in the eurozone eased modestly in June, as softer services growth offset a still-surging manufacturing base where job creation is running at a 10-year high.
 
Stocks in Tokyo rose 0.11% while stocks in Hong Kong declined 0.02%. In Shanghai, stocks rose 0.33%.
 
Oil prices in the U.S. early Friday rose 0.16% to $42.81 a barrel, after rising 0.5% on Thursday, June 22. Crude has recovered after a two-day selloff earlier in the week sent prices to their lowest level in 10 months.
 
The economic calendar in the U.S. on Friday includes the PMI Composite Flash Index for June at 9:45 a.m. ET, New Home Sales for May at 10 a.m., and the weekly Baker Hughes Rig Count at 1 p.m.
 
St. Louis Federal Reserve Bank President James Bullard is scheduled to discuss the U.S. economy and monetary policy at the Illinois Bankers Association Annual Conference in Nashville, at 11:15 a.m., Cleveland Fed President Loretta Mester will be the keynote speaker at the Policy Summit on Housing, Human Capital and Inequality in Cleveland at 12:40 p.m., and Federal Reserve Board Gov. Jerome Powell is expected to speak at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago Symposium on Central Clearing, at 2:15 p.m.

Earnings are expected Friday from BlackBerry Ltd. (BBRY) and Finish Line Inc. (FINL) .

2. -- For the third time in as many years, all 34 of the country's biggest banks met the minimum capital standards in annual Federal Reserve stress tests designed to safeguard the U.S. from another financial crisis. 

The reviews gauged whether lenders with more than $50 billion in assets could withstand a hypothetical "severe global recession" in which the unemployment rate peaks at 10% by the third quarter of 2018 while equity prices fall by 50% through the end of this year.

Overall, the results showed that the banking sector is well-capitalized, with the vast majority of firms maintaining significant capital buffers in the scenario. However, a few institutions came close to a minimum level that will be considered in a second, more important set of tests coming next week, including Goldman Sachs Group Inc. (GS) , Morgan Stanley (MS) and State Street Corp. (STT) .

One new bank that participated in the test, CIT Group Inc. (CIT) , was well above minimum requirements, much better than a private trial run last year.

3. -- Amazon.com Inc. (AMZN) is looking to charge advertisers $2.8 million for packages that include 30-second spots during the Thursday night National Football League games it will stream live to its Prime customers this coming football season, two people familiar with the matter told Reuters.

Amazon is paying $50 million to the NFL to stream this season's 10 Thursday night games, sources told Reuters in April, as the online retailer pushes into live sports. The games will be shown simultaneously on either CBS Corp. (CBS) or Comcast Corp.'s (CMCSA) NBC, which are broadcasting five games each.

The live-streamed games will only be available to subscribers to Amazon's Prime service, which costs $99 a year. 

Amazon takes over from Twitter Inc. TWTR, which paid $10 million to stream Thursday night games last season.

Comcast is a holding in Jim Cramer's Action Alerts PLUS Charitable Trust Portfolio. Want to be alerted before Cramer buys or sells CMCSA? Learn more now.

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