After closing the books on February with the best monthly gain in a year, the big S&P 500 index followed things up with a 1.37% rally on Wednesday, the best single-day trading session since November.

So, yes, just in case there was any doubt, we're in a clear-cut bull market right now.

And, perhaps more importantly, some of the biggest stocks on Wall Street could still have their best days ahead of them. That's because, despite a 23.74% total return in the S&P over the course of the past 12 months, many blue chips are teetering on the verge of new breakouts as we head into March.

Jim Cramer sat down with four market experts to talk about how to play the Trump tax plan, the administration's impact on the dollar, commodities and more. Click here to check out their recommendations.

To figure out which big stocks you should buy--and when you should buy them--we're turning to the charts for a technical look at five that are breaking out ...

First, a quick note on the technical toolbox we're using here: technical analysis is a study of the market itself. Since the market is ultimately the only mechanism that determines a stock's price, technical analysis is a valuable tool even in the roughest of trading conditions. Technical charts are used every day by proprietary trading floors, Wall Street's biggest financial firms and individual investors to get an edge on the market. And research shows that skilled technical traders can bank gains as much as 90% of the time.

Every week, I take an in-depth look at big names that are telling important technical stories. Here's this week's look at five big stocks to trade ...

General Electric

Leading off the big-cap buy list today is General Electric (GE - Get Report) . It wasn't all that long ago that GE looked like a stock you didn't want to own. But now that the selling in this stock has played out, shares are looking primed for a reversal in March. Here's how to trade it ...

After rolling over in the middle of January, GE started forming an inverse head and shoulders pattern, a bullish reversal setup that signals exhaustion among sellers. The pattern is formed by two swing lows that bottom out at approximately the same level (the shoulders), separated by a lower low (the head). The buy signal comes on a move through GE's neckline at the $30.25 level. Shares ended within a few cents of that breakout level at yesterday's close.

Price momentum, measured by 14-day RSI, is the side-indicator to look at in GE. Our momentum gauge has made a series of higher lows during this stock's inverse head and shoulders setup, a bullish divergence that indicates buyers are stepping in behind the scenes. Still, price is primary--wait for GE to materially push through $30.25 before you buy it.

AT&T Inc.

Meanwhile, telecom giant AT&T Inc. (T - Get Report) is enjoying a bullish turn of their own: shares have pushed almost 16% higher since bottoming back in the middle of November. Don't worry if you've missed out on that upside move in AT&T though--this stock looks ready to kick off a second leg higher, thanks to a textbook technical price setup that's been forming in shares since the end of December.

AT&T is showing traders an ascending triangle pattern, a bullish continuation setup that's formed by horizontal resistance up above shares at $42.50, and uptrending support to the downside. Basically, as AT&T ricochets in between those two technically important price levels, shares have been getting squeezed closer and closer to a breakout through that aforementioned $42.50 price ceiling. When that happens, we've got a brand new buy signal in AT&T.

From a risk management standpoint, it makes sense to park a protective stop on the other side of AT&T's most recent swing low at $40.50. That's because, if shares violate that $40.50 level, then the ascending triangle pattern is over, and you don't want to own it anymore.

Charles Schwab Corp.

We're seeing the exact same setup in shares of $55 billion brokerage firm Charles Schwab Corp. (SCHW - Get Report) right now--with, totally coincidentally, the exact same breakout level. For Schwab, the ascending triangle triggers a buy on a push through $42.50, and that level finally got taken out in yesterday's session.

What makes that $42.50 level so important for Schwab (and for AT&T, for that matter)? It all boils down to buyers and sellers. Price patterns, like this ascending triangle setup, are a good quick way to identify what's going on in the price action, but they're not the ultimate reason shares look attractive here. Instead, the "why" is driven by basic supply and demand for SCHW's shares themselves.

The $42.50 resistance level is a price where there has been an excess of supply of shares; in other words, it's a spot where sellers have previously been more eager to step in and take gains than buyers have been to buy. That's what makes a breakout above $42.50 so significant--the move means that buyers are finally strong enough to absorb all of the excess supply above that price level. With $42.50 now (just barely) in the rear-view mirror for SCHW, it makes sense to buy this week ...

Jim Cramer sat down with four market experts to talk about how to play the Trump tax plan, the administration's impact on the dollar, commodities and more. Click here to check out their recommendations.

Statoil ASA

Norwegian energy giant Statoil ASA (STO) is testing a key breakout level of its own this week--and after lagging the broad market averages for most of this year, shareholders should start paying attention to this stock again. Put simply, Statoil is starting to look "bottomy" in the very short-term, and it could clear the way toward a retest of 52-week highs ...

Statoil has spent the last month forming a rounding bottom pattern, a bullish reversal setup that looks just like it sounds. The rounding bottom in Statoil indicates a gradual shift in control of shares from sellers to buyers--and it triggers when shares muster the strength to push through their near-term resistance level at the top of the pattern at $17.85.

A breakout through that $17.85 level clears the way up to prior highs at $19, a level that previously acted like a barrier back in January. That makes it a logical level to build a starter position in anticipation of a secondary breakout through $19. The $19 breakout is more technically significant--so it's the signal to wait for in order to scale up your Statoil position.

Jim Cramer sat down with four market experts to talk about how to play the Trump tax plan, the administration's impact on the dollar, commodities and more. Click here to check out their recommendations.

UBS Group AG

Rounding out our list of blue chip buy signals is financial giant UBS Group AG (UBS - Get Report) . The entire financial sector got a shot in the arm during Wednesday's trading session, as market participants got fired up about the prospect of higher interest rates from the Fed on bank profits. But UBS' price action is particularly good right now, and you don't need to be an expert technical trader to figure out why ...

UBS has been bouncing its way higher in a well-defined uptrending channel since July. Uptrends are about as straightforward as technical price patterns get, and UBS' setup is formed by a pair of parallel trendlines that have managed to corral most of this stock's price action over that timeframe. Yesterday's bounce off of trendline support looks like a low-risk, relatively high-reward opportunity to buy UBS.

Actually waiting for that bounce is important for two key reasons: it's the spot where shares have the most room to move up before they hit resistance, and it's the spot where the risk is the least (because shares have the least room to move lower before the channel breaks, invalidating the upside trade). Remember, all trend lines do eventually break, but by actually waiting for the bounce to happen first, you're ensuring UBS can actually still catch a bid along that line before you put your money on shares.

Jim Cramer sat down with four market experts to talk about how to play the Trump tax plan, the administration's impact on the dollar, commodities and more. Click here to check out their recommendations.

At the time of publication, author had no positions in the stocks mentioned.