Amazon's (AMZN - Get Report)  might be ready to do for beer what it's done for books and music, and that's reason enough for a struggling industry to raise a glass.

The online retailing giant has applied for a liquor license for its drive-through grocery store in Seattle, USA Today reported late Wednesday, and documents link the 9,700 square-foot complex in the city's Ballard neighborhood to the online giant.

The venture has been described as "a new model of grocery shopping," where customers place their orders online and then collect them during a specific 15-minute to 2-hour window. Amazon is also thought to be working on similar sites in downtown Seattle and two in Silicon Valley.

The model could be a boon to U.S. beer makers, where overall sales fell 0.2% in 2015 to $105.9 billion, according to the latest figures from the Brewers Associations. Craft beer sales, however, were up 16% in dollar terms to $22.3 billion.

Craft beer held 12.2% of the U.S. beer market however, compared with 71% of for domestic beer.

Craft beer producers face an uphill battle, which could only be helped by Amazon. The beer market is dominated by one name - Budweiser-maker AB InBev (BUD) .

AB InBev held 43.5% of the U.S. markets in 2015, and that was before it completed its "MegaBrew" merger with SAB Miller. One in every three beers bought and poured in the world is a brand owned by AB InBev, this is almost three times its biggest competitor Heineken (HEINY) .

Molson Coors (TAP - Get Report) was the second biggest seller of beer in the U.S. with 25.1% of the market.

Growth in the market is leading many brewers to invest in artisan beer makers. Heineken owns 50% of Lagunitas and Japan's Kirin (KNBWY) owns part of Brooklyn Brewery.

The makers of Redhook Ale and Kona, Craft Brew Alliance (BREW - Get Report) , have a commercial agreement with AB InBev, which includes distribution.

Amazon in the U.K. offers alcohol for sale through its website and grocery delivery business.