Trump Sold All of His Stocks in June, Spokesman Miller Says

Turns out, Donald Trump doesn't own stock in Boeing. Nor in Microsoft, or Ford, or Amazon, or AT&T, or any of several other companies whose policies may be affected by his future administration, and all of which he said he held as of a financial disclosure he made in May. He's gotten rid of all that stock, his spokesman Jason Miller said today. Sold it all in June, Miller said.

Miller made the comment on a call with the press regarding Trump's morning tweet criticizing Boeing (BA)  for overcharging the government on the sale of a new version of Air Force One. Miller later confirmed to the AP that he did indeed mean that Trump had sold not just his Boeing stock, but all of his stocks at that time. The AP asked for proof, and Miller declined to provide it.

The Trump transition team did not respond to requests for comment on the stock sales or to provide any evidence of it.

The announcement comes amid growing conflict-of-interest concerns regarding Trump's business endeavors that are not necessarily shared by the president-elect, his family or his business associates. In his May 2016 financial disclosure, the self-described billionaire listed millions of dollars in investments in dozens of publicly-traded companies across a wide range of industries, including banking, technology, energy and autos.

Trump's camp has been rather coy regarding what will happen to his private business interests, including stock holdings, now that he has been elected. The Washington Post reported as recently as last week that a Trump spokeswoman did not respond to requests for comment for one of its stories on Trump's stock portfolio. Trump announced on Twitter in late November that he will discuss what will happen with the Trump Organization at a December 15 news conference. There is no indication he will divest of the company, and signs point to him holding control over to his children instead.

Trump held positions in a number of companies about which he spoke frequently while campaigning and after his election. One such example is Apple (AAPL) , of which he previously held as much as $2.25 million in shares.

On the campaign trail, the real estate magnate was at times critical of the tech giant, claiming that as president he would get Apple to manufacture their "damn computers" in America and at one point floating the idea of boycotting the company until it helped the FBI break into the iPhone of one of the San Bernardino shooters.

After his election, the president-elect told the New York Times he had been in touch with Apple CEO Tim Cook and asked him to get the company to "build a big plant in the United States." He also said he told him his administration would be going after a "very large tax cut for corporations." Trump has proposed dropping the corporate tax rate to 15%.

Trump also told the Times that Microsoft (MSFT) founder Bill Gates had called him after the election. During a campaign speech in South Carolina a year ago, Trump said he would work on closing up parts of the Internet to fight terrorism by going to see Gates and "a lot of different people that really understand what's happening." In his May filing, he listed up to $600,000 in Microsoft shares.

He disclosed a position in Amazon (AMZN) of up to $100,000. Trump frequently criticized the e-commerce company's CEO, Jeff Bezos.

In May, Trump contended Amazon has a "huge antitrust problem" and said the company is "getting away with murder, tax-wise." He accused Bezos of using the Post, which he owns, to wield power over lawmakers to avoid taxes.

He disclosed holdings in Ford (F) as well, which he frequently criticized for outsourcing on the campaign trail. After his election, he falsely took credit for the company's decision to keep one of its plants in Kentucky.

Trump listed holdings in companies about which his administration stands to make important decisions once he is in the White House.

He held shares of both AT&T (T) and Time Warner (TWX) , which announced an $85 billion merger in October that his Justice Department will oversee. Trump said he would seek to block the deal when it was first announced because it concentrated too much "power in the hands of too few." However, he may have since changed his tune. The Financial Times reported last week that AT&T was encouraged by Trump's appointments of two former competition antitrust officials with a hands-off record on enforcement.

He listed holdings in Wells Fargo (WFC) as well, which earlier this year was flagged and fined by the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau for creating millions of phony accounts.

Trump had also previously listed holdings in Energy Transfer Partners (ETP) , the owner of the $3.7 billion Dakota Access pipeline that has become a political flashpoint in recent months. A Trump spokeswoman confirmed in late November he had sold off his stake over the summer. Trump has been supportive of the project, a stance Miller reaffirmed on Monday.

Also in the Trump portfolio was IBM (IBM) , whose CEO, Ginni Rometty, reached out to Trump soon after his election in an open letter outlining areas for cooperation. She will now form part of a CEO advisory forum to Trump. And, he listed holdings of Goldman Sachs (GS) , where his Treasury Secretary nominee, Steve Mnuchin, was a former executive and his top adviser, Steve Bannon, worked as well.

This is not the first time Trump has said he bought and sold a significant number of stocks all at once.

When he made his first personal finance disclosure in July 2015, soon after announcing his candidacy, he claimed to have sold 45 stocks in January 2014 for a gain of more than $27 million. He said he made only five losing picks: Coca-Cola (KO) , D.R. Horton (DHI) , Enbridge Inc. (ENB) , Occidental Petroleum (OXY) and PepsiCo (PEP) .

The Trump camp did not return request for comment on how much the president-elect made on his stock sales this time around.

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