The Dow Jones Industrial Average retreated from records on Friday as banks reversed course after days of big gains. 

The Dow Jones Industrial Average slid 0.11% to settle at 19,170. The blue-chip index had notched a new record of 19,191 on Thursday. The S&P 500 rose 0.04%, and the Nasdaq increased 0.09%.

Financials were among the worst performers on markets Friday. The sector had risen earlier in the week as President-elect Donald Trump filled out his Cabinet this week with what were seen as Wall Street-friendly Cabinet picks. Goldman Sachs (GS - Get Report) and JPMorgan (JPM - Get Report) weighed on the Dow. Wells Fargo (WFC - Get Report) , Citigroup (C - Get Report) , and Morgan Stanley (MS - Get Report) were also lower.

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The U.S. economy added 178,000 jobs in November, according to the Labor Department, just slightly higher than an anticipated increase of 174,000. The U.S. unemployment rate fell to 4.6% from 4.9%, hitting its lowest level since August 2007. Average wages fell 0.1% after reaching their best level since July a month earlier.

The U.S. jobs report makes the chances of a December rate hike all the more likely. Federal Reserve members have recently telegraphed a December increase, arguing that the case for policy normalization had strengthened.

The likelihood of a rate hike when the Fed meets Dec.13-14 currently sits at 95%, according to CME Group fed funds futures. Most are anticipating an increase of 25 basis points, but some, including Ameriprise senior economist Russell Price, argue there is a slim chance the recent run of positive economic data could push the Fed to hike by 50 basis points.

"This would likely come as a short-term shock to markets, but given the rise in market rates that has already occurred and the strong position of the U.S. banking system, markets would come to see the hike as appropriate rather quickly," Russell wrote in a note.

The Dow scored a new record close on Thursday as banking and energy stocks gave the blue-chip index a boost. A tech selloff pulled the S&P 500 and Nasdaq lower.

Crude oil prices extended a two-day rally into day three on Friday. Crude had rocketed to six-week highs on Thursday as traders cheered a production freeze agreement among major oil-producing nations. The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries reached a deal on Wednesday to trim production by 1.2 million barrels a day, its first cut since 2008.

In domestic news, the number of active oil rigs in the U.S. rose by 3 to 477, according to Baker Hughes data. Crude has been under pressure as domestic production continues to climb despite a prolonged period of lower oil prices.

West Texas Intermediate crude closed up 1.2% at $51.68 a barrel on Friday.

Starbucks (SBUX - Get Report) fell 2.2% after CEO Howard Schultz announced his departure. Schultz will resign from his position, effective April 3, and will join the board as executive chairman to focus on big-picture initiatives. Chief Operating Officer Kevin Johnson will assume the CEO position come April.

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Big Lots (BIG - Get Report) moved slightly higher after raising its anticipated full-year earnings forecast. The retailer expects adjusted earnings between $3.55 and $3.60 a share, up from its previous range of $3.45 to $3.55 a share. Analysts forecast full-year earnings of $3.53 a share. Its same-store sales target of 1% to 2% growth was unchanged.

Smith & Wesson (SWHC) tumbled 12% after issuing weaker guidance for its current quarter than expected. Adjusted earnings for its recent quarter did top analysts' estimates, though, with per-share profit of 68 cents coming in 12 cents higher than forecast.