Editors' pick: Originally published Nov. 22.

Picking a wine for the holidays can be daunting. If you're hosting, you want to please everyone but you can't offer 10 different wines.

And if you're going to someone's house, you may not know what they're serving or what they even like.

So we set out to get you some answers. We went to the Brooklyn Winery , in Brooklyn, N.Y., and asked winemaker Conor McCormack.

McCormack makes 8000 cases of 15-20 different wines with grapes that are sources all from all over the country. And since they often host events at the winery, the guy spends a lot of time pairing food and wine for people he's never met.

So we figured he was the perfect person to ask.

Ok, need to bring something? A bubbly is always safe. Champagne, Prosecco. Let your budget dictate but good choices.

Or bring what you want to drink, he says. And when the hostess asks if you want it opened, say "Yes!"

Ideally you want to match the wine to the food, but unless you're hosting you often don't know what's being served.

So either ask what's for dinner or just go with one of McCormack's suggestions below.

He poured a Riesling, Pinot Noir and a Cabernet Franc for us to taste.

Watch the video to learn what foods they pair perfectly these wines, but you can't go wrong any of them. They easy-drinking, not too powerful and have less tannins then a big Cabernet Sauvignon. That basically means you can drink them all day without feeling too tipsy.

And sometimes you just need staying power on the holidays.

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