Germany's Deputy Finance Minister Talks Trade, Deutsche Bank In Wake of US Election

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- As Americans head to the polls to choose the United State's 45th president, the rest of the world is watching in anticipation to see how the victor's policies and directives could affect other nations.

German Deputy Finance Minister Jens Spahn appeared on Tuesday morning's "Bloomberg Markets: European Close" to discuss what impact, if any, the outcome of this election will have on his country.

"We just know, whether it is Trump or Clinton there will be different kinds of challenges, let me call it this way. So we all wait for the results," Spahn said. He was responding to BloombergTV anchor Mark Barton's question as to which candidate would be better for Germany and Europe. Spahn would not answer that question directly since the election is taking place today.

Barton went on to ask Spahn to explain the challenges facing Germany and Europe if there is a Clinton or Trump presidency.

"Well in both presidencies actually we need to talk about a common approach when it comes to free trade. We obviously have to [talk] about it since it was a big part of the campaign in the U.S. On the other side we see in the neighborhood of Europe, if it is Syria, if it is Russia and Ukraine, or North Africa, we do have common tasks to fulfill," Spahn continued.

The bigger discussion would have to be how much the U.S. is willing to engage in these conflicts in the future no matter which candidate is victorious.

Barton then brought up the issues facing German banking giant Deutsche Bank (DB) , noting that the company may prefer a Clinton presidency and that Trump may not be willing to come to a favorable conclusion to the DOJ settlement issues.

"This is a nonpolitical process with the settlement with Deutsche Bank and the U.S. authorities and I hope it will remain a nonpolitical process," Spahn said.

The finance minister is trusting the process and believes the two sides are discussing what needs to be discussed in order to come to an appropriate conclusion to the issue. But, he would not go into further details.

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