NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Shares of SeaWorld Entertainment  (SEAS)  were rising in late-afternoon trading on Friday as the theme park and entertainment company is expected to report 2016 third-quarter results before Tuesday's market open. 

Wall Street is forecasting SeaWorld will see a year-over-year decrease in earnings and revenue during the quarter. 

Analysts surveyed by FactSet are looking for adjusted earnings of $1.06 per share on revenue of $486 million. 

In 2015, Orlando-based SeaWorld posted adjusted earnings of $1.14 per share with $497 million in revenue for the third quarter. 

Separately, TheStreet Ratings objectively rated this stock according to its "risk-adjusted" total return prospect over a 12-month investment horizon. Not based on the news in any given day, the rating may differ from Jim Cramer's view or that of this articles's author. 

The team rates SeaWorld as a Hold with a ratings score of C. The company's strengths can be seen in multiple areas, such as its increase in net income, growth in earnings per share and expanding profit margins. However, as a counter to these strengths, the team also finds weaknesses including a generally disappointing performance in the stock itself, generally higher debt management risk and weak operating cash flow.

You can view the full analysis from the report here: SEAS

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