Ticket Prices Range High for Big-Name Musical Tours Launching This Year, Next

The musical year will end with a splash and 2017 will pick up with a roar. 

Tickets won't always be cheap but they will be widely available for most shows. 

The star-studded iHeartRadio Jingle Ball Tour launches near the end of this month. The tour will make stops in Dallas (Nov. 29), San Jose (Dec. 1), Los Angeles (Dec. 2), Minneapolis (Dec. 5), Philadelphia (Dec. 7), New York City (Dec. 9), Boston (Dec. 11), Washington D.C. (Dec. 12), Atlanta (Dec. 17) and Miami (Dec. 18).

The tour will feature a who's who of the hit charts, with Meghan Trainor, Fifth Harmony, Hailee Steinfeld, DNCE, Ariana Grande and G-Eazy all set to appear. Each show will have other musical guests, as well, so don't miss out on a once-in-a-lifetime chance to see all these amazing acts.

Tickets for Jingle Ball aren't cheap, currently averaging $219 across all dates on the secondary market, according to data provided by TicketIQ. As of now, the priciest Jingle Ball stop is the New York City performance on Dec. 9 at Madison Square Garden.

Justin Bieber's presence is probably responsible for the pricy tickets, but Ariana Grande and Meghan Trainor are helping to increase demand, as well. Tickets are averaging a lofty $781, with the cheapest ticket going for $125. The most affordable stop along the route will be the Dec. 14 show at the Allstate Arena in Rosemont, Ill. The lineup will feature the Backstreet Boys, Ariana Grande, and more, and tickets are averaging just $120, with the cheapest ticket available for $30.

The new year will see major rock tours , most notably from Green Day. After spending the first two months of 2017 overseas, Green Day will return to the states for a mega North American tour that will start in Phoenix on March 1. With their new album "Revolution Radio" doing well, the band, Billie Joe Armstrong, Tre Cool and Mike Dirnt, are proving that they haven't lost anything since their first big hit, 1994's "Dookie." Tickets for Green Day's tour are averaging $160 across all dates.

The Red Hot Chili Peppers will also be on tour in 2017, starting with a Jan. 5 performance in San Antonio, Tex., and going until at least mid-March. All concertgoers will receive a choice of a physical or digital copy of the band's newest release, "The Getaway!" featuring their latest hit, "Go Robot."

Flea and his fellow Peppers-Anthony Kiedis, Chad Smith and Josh Klinghoffer are every bit a powerhouse on stage as they've always been, and resale ticket prices prove it. As of now, tickets for RHCP are averaging $253, with the priciest shows clocking in averages of $596 (Oakland) and $403 (New York City).

For country music fans, tours won't get much bigger than Tim McGraw & Faith Hill. The duo will hit the road in 2017 for a combined tour called "Soul 2 Soul." McGraw has seen 10 of his 14 albums reach No. 1 status, including his latest, "Damn Country Music." Meanwhile, Hill is considered one of the most successful country artists of all time, selling more than 40 million records since arriving in Nashville with 1993's "Take Me As I Am." The tour kicks off on April 7 in New Orleans, and is currently scheduled to go through October. Tickets for that trek are already averaging $243 on the resale market, so fans are encouraged to buy now.

This article is commentary by an independent contributor. At the time of publication, the author held TK positions in the stocks mentioned.

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