There's a huge market in wine these days, thanks to auction houses like Christie's Sotheby's and Zachys.

And since many of these auctions are on online, buyers and sellers can easily come together and buy superior wines that would not typically be accessible. 

The latest rarity coming to market: a 1924 4.5-liter bottle of Chateau Pétrus, one of Bordeaux's premier wines.

And it's expected to fetch six figures.

Because the wine world has been on fire lately.

Take the wine auction of the late co-founder of Chesapeake Energy, Aubrey McClendon. His collection sold for $8.4 million back in September, much more than they expected, according to Hart Davis Hart Wine of Chicago, who ran the event.

Or the recent October auction at Zachys that was dubbed "The Vault," because the seller wanted to remain anonymous. That auction realized more than $5.5 million, including over $90,000 spent on six magnums.

So get out your paddles, because there is another exceptional event coming up in December. Zachys got its hands on the collection of Nath. Johnston & Fils, from Bordeaux, France.

This legendary wine-world family, whose company was founded in 1734, has decided to sell its centuries-old wine collection.

What's so unique about this collection is that "the wines were purchased directly from the châteaux [a.k.a. the wineries], on release, and have been in the possession of Nath. Johnston & Fils ever since," says Charles Antin, Zachys senior international wine specialist and auctioneer.

"In addition, many of the bottles have been re-conditioned at their respective châteaux, and re-corked, re-labeled, and re-capsuled at that time," adds Antin.

That means the actual château tested the wine to make sure it's still good and aging properly.

Collectors call that its "provenance," which basically is its record of ownership, and whether it's art or an antique, it is used as a guide to authenticate quality. 

Well, the provenance of this collection is stellar.

And the star of the show will be that 4.5-liter bottle of 1924 Pétrus.

There have been 1.5 liters of that wine auctioned, one of which went for $5,500 at a Christie's auction in 2015, according to Wine Market Journal, an industry source for wine action trade values. But never has a 4.5-liter bottle, which is dubbed a Jeroboam and is equivalent to six standard bottles, been available.

It is a collector's dream come true. 

There are also six regular bottles of that 1924 Pétrus. And again, there's little record to determine pricing, but a bottle sold for around $3,600, at a Christie's Asian auction in 2010, according to Wine Market Journal.

And while counterfeiting is always a concern, "these bottles were purchased on release by the current owners' grandfather and were tested and confirmed at Pétrus," says Antin, who was one of the auctioneer's at The Vault event.

And whether it is the improving economy or the wealthy continuing to pass money on to the next generation via wine, the rarity and provenance of this collection could mean huge dollars at this auction. 

But why now?

"There is no particular 'why now,'" says Antin. "They just have a lot, and decided it was time." 

So if you happen to be in Manhattan on December 2 and 3, head on over to Smith & Wollensky and bid on a bottle.

Or sit on your hands and watch others go for it.

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