Odds of Negative Interest Rates in the U.S. Are Slim

The odds of the U.S. lowering interest rates to negative levels remain low, because other forms of monetary policy such as quantitative easing could be adopted first.

The odds of utilizing quantitative easing are "quite high" or policies such as the use of repurchase agreements and the term deposit facility, said Michael Kramer, a portfolio manager on Covestor, the online investing marketplace and founder of Mott Capital Management, a registered investment advisor in Garden City, NY.

Choosing a negative interest rate policy (NIRP) in the U.S. would also affect the stock markets immensely and hinder bank profits.

"Due to the size of treasury and money markets, it could have some very severe ramifications," he said. "In my view, our treasury markets are the safest and most liquid in the world."

Investors would seek a higher return on capital elsewhere such as higher paying bonds which carry more risk, Kramer said.

"This could become problematic for the US government which is dependent on issuing debt to fund the government operation," he said.

Negative rates in the U.S. would result in too much risk and backlash and would only occur if all other attempts by the Fed failed.

"At this point, the Fed has a few other tools it can use before it has to use the tool of last resort," Kramer said.

The use of negative rates remains divisive despite the growing adoption of them in the central banks of the Eurozone along with Denmark, Japan, Sweden and Switzerland. In countries such as Japan and Germany, investors are forced to pay a fee instead of earning interest.

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