European stocks rose on Tuesday as the euro fell and a poll suggested U.K. "Brexit" advocates are losing ground.

One euro recently bought $1.18, down 0.36%, and was worth just under 77 pence, a fall of 0.72%, with the declines helping exporters. The U.K. currency rose against the dollar as well as the euro after a Daily Telegraph poll put the "remain" camp decisively in the lead ahead of the U.K.'s June 23 poll about whether Britain should stay in the European Union. The poll found 55% of respondents planned to vote to stay in the EU, 42% wanted out and 3% were undecided.

In London, the FTSE 100 was recently up 0.55% to 6,170.10. In Frankfurt, the Dax climbed 0.51% to 9.892.28 and in Paris the Cac 40 rose 1.00% to 4,368.16.

The Athens Stock Exchange General Index was recently down 1.20% at 6,41.34 as Greek officials prepare to meet eurozone finance ministers to discuss the release of bailout funding. The International Monetary Fund rose to Greece's rescue yesterday, arguing that eurozone creditors should give it more breathing space.

S&P 500 mini futures were recently up 0.20%.

West Texas crude was recently down 0.69% at $47.75.

In Germany, detailed first-quarter GDP figures showed investment by companies in equipment and machinery was powering growth as the Federal Statistical Office confirmed that the economy expanded by 0.7% on the quarter and 1.3% year-on-year.

But Germany's ZEW institute reported an unexpected decline in its index of analysts' and investors' economic sentiment for both Germany and the eurozone in May.

Old Mutual was recently up 1.5% in London after confirming it's received approaches for its separately listed OM Asset Management (OMAM) unit. The Financial Times had reported that it is close to a sale of the business to New York-listed Affiliated Managers Group (AMG - Get Report) as part of its breakup plan. The paper said Affiliated Managers would pay cash and shares for Old Mutual's 66% stake in OM Asset Management, which had a market value of $1.7 billion as of Monday's close in New York.

Bank notes printer De La Rue surged close to 4% in London after reporting rising full-year revenue and profit that was in line with upgraded expectations and declaring cuts of about 10% of its workforce.

Intermediate Capital fell more than 2% as it drew a line under special dividends with a final GBP200 million ($290.6 million) payout. "No further special dividends are anticipated thereafter," it said.

It confirmed the final special dividend payout as it announced adjusted full-year profit fell to GBP156.6 million from GBP184.1 million because of a change in market value of derivatives held for hedging business. The result beat the forecast of Jefferies International.

French household equipment manufacturer Groupe SEB was up almost 11% in Paris after saying late on Monday it would pay EUR1.7 billion ($1.9 billion) for German peer WMF, which is now a portfolio company of Kohlberg Kravis Roberts. (KKR - Get Report)

In Tokyo, the Nikkei 225 fell 0.94% to 16,498.76 as the yen rose. The Topix fell 0.91% to 1,326.50.

Sony (SNE - Get Report) closed down 0.6%. The company delivered a profit forecast that fell short of expectations.

It is expecting a 46% in net profit to Y80 billion ($730.5 million) in the 12 months ending March 2017 because of the costs of repairing earthquake damage to a semiconductor plant and a slowdown in smartphone equipment.

In Hong Kong, the Hang Seng closed up 0.03% at 19,815.17. On mainland China, the CSI 300 composite fell 0.77% to close at 3,063.56.