Investors have been snubbing stocks and flocking into "flight to safety" investment strategies.

The U.S. Treasury bond exchange-traded fund, the gold ETF and the utilities ETF now have year-to-date gains of 9.7%, 20% and 14.1%, respectively, vs. 8.2%, 21.4% and 12.8% a week ago.

The S&P 500 SPDR ETF (SPY - Get Report) has a year-to-date gain of just 0.4%, down from 0.9% a week ago, as "flight to safety" investments out-shine riskier stock market investments.

The junk bond ETF, which is somewhat correlated to stocks, improved to a year-to-date gain of 2.6%, up from 2.3%, but down from 4.1% two weeks ago.

Investors can trade the U.S. Treasury 30-year bond like a stock using the 20+ Year Treasury Bond ETF (TLT - Get Report) , which is backed by a basket of U.S. Treasury bonds with maturities of 20 years to 30 years.

Investors can trade gold like a stock using the SPDR Gold Shares ETF (GLD - Get Report) , which is backed by gold bullion.

Investors seeking the safety of dividends can trade the Utilities Select Sector SPDR Fund (XLU - Get Report) , which is a basket of 29 utility stocks.

Investors betting that junk bond yields will tighten against U.S. Treasuries should consider the SPDR Barclays High Yield Bond ETF (JNK - Get Report) .

Here's the daily chart for the bond ETF.

Courtesy of MetaStock Xenith

The bond ETF ended last week at $132.28, up 9.7% year to date and down 2.2% from its Feb. 11 high of $135.25.

The daily chart shows horizontal lines, which are the Fibonacci Retracement levels of the rise from the June 26 low of $114.88 to the Feb. 11 high of $135.25.

The ETF held its 38.2% retracement of $127.46 on March 11, March 16 and again on April 26, providing buying opportunities on weakness. The bond ETF traded as high as $132.99 on April 7, giving investors the opportunity to reduce holdings at my key technical level of $132.45. This level is in play until the end of 2016, given Friday's high of $132.28.

Investors looking to buy the bond ETF should do so on weakness to $129.84, which is a key level on technical charts until the end of June.

Investors looking to reduce holdings should continue to do so on strength to $132.45 and $133.04, which are key levels until the end of 2016 and until the end of this week, respectively. My key level for May is $131.02, which remains a magnet.

Here's the weekly chart for the gold ETF.

Courtesy of MetaStock Xenith

The gold ETF ended last week at $121.71, up 20% year to date after setting a new 52-week high of $123.96 on May 2.

The weekly chart is positive but overbought, with the ETF above its key weekly moving average of $119.80 and in position to challenge the 200-week simple moving average of $127.33. The gold ETF has been below its 200-week since the week of May 10, 2013, when the average was $140.53. The weekly momentum reading rose to 83.05, up from 80.59 on May 6, moving further above the overbought threshold of 80.00.

Investors looking to buy the gold ETF should do so on weakness to $119.99 and $115.64, which are key levels on technical charts until the end of this week and until the end of May, respectively.

Investors looking to reduce holdings should consider doing so on strength to the 200-week simple moving average, which is declining from $127.33.

Here's the weekly chart for the Utilities ETF.

Courtesy of MetaStock Xenith

The utilities ETF ended last week at $49.39, up 14.1% year to date and just 1% below its all-time high of $49.88, set on April 1.

The weekly chart is positive, with the ETF above its key weekly moving average of $48.42, and well above its 200-week simple moving average of $41.44. The weekly momentum reading rose to 75.91 last week, up from 74.28 on May 6.

Investors looking to buy the utilities ETF should wait until my proprietary analytics generates appropriate levels at which to buy on weakness.

Investors looking to reduce holdings should do so on strength to $50.15, which is a key level on technical charts until the end of June.

Key levels of $48.60 and $48.94 remain magnets until the end of June and May, respectively.

Here's the weekly chart for the junk bond ETF.

Courtesy of MetaStock Xenith

The junk bond ETF ended last week at $34.80, up 2.6% year to date and up 11.3% from its Feb. 11 low of $31.27. Even so, the ETF is in correction territory, 11% below its 52-week high of $39.48, set on May 8, 2015. This ETF is in correction territory, 11.8% below its 52-week high of $39.46, set on May 15, 2015.

The weekly chart is positive but overbought, with the ETF above its key weekly moving average of $34.55, and well below its 200-week simple moving average of $39.14. The weekly momentum reading slipped to 88.60 last week, down from 89.92 on May 6, becoming slightly less overbought but still above the 80.00 threshold.

Investors looking to buy the junk bond ETF should do so on weakness to $33.40 and $32.52, which are key levels on technical charts until the end of June and May, respectively.

Investors looking to reduce holdings should do so on strength to $37.53, which is a key level on technical charts until the end of this week and until the end of June.

This article is commentary by an independent contributor. At the time of publication, the author held no positions in the stocks mentioned.