NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Shares of Conn's (CONN - Get Report) are falling by 22.62% to $12.11 on Tuesday morning, after the company posted its 2016 fourth quarter results.

Before today's opening bell, the Woodlands, TX-based retailer reported adjusted earnings of 11 cents per diluted share, which did not meet analysts' estimates of 28 cents per share.

Revenue rose by 7% to $456.8 million year-over-year and was higher than Wall Street's expectations of $455.8 million.

Additionally, same store sales slipped by 1.7% during the quarter.

"We remain confident in our market opportunity, our business model, and the value we provide our customers. Going forward, we are making strategic enhancements in our business to digest the rapid growth we have experienced and improve our infrastructure to produce consistent and predictable earnings growth," CEO Norm Miller said in a statement,

During fiscal 2017, the company said it will make investments in IT, credit and personnel to support its long-term goal of becoming a national retailer.

Conn's is a specialty retailer of furniture and mattresses, home appliances, consumer electronics and home office products.

Separately, TheStreet Ratings Team has a "Hold" rating with a score of C- on the stock.

The primary factors that have impacted the rating are mixed - some indicating strength, some showing weaknesses, with little evidence to justify the expectation of either a positive or negative performance for this stock relative to most other stocks.

The company's strengths can be seen in multiple areas, such as its increase in net income, revenue growth and reasonable valuation levels.

As a counter to these strengths, the team also finds weaknesses including disappointing return on equity, generally higher debt management risk and a generally disappointing performance in the stock itself.

Recently, TheStreet Ratings objectively rated this stock according to its "risk-adjusted" total return prospect over a 12-month investment horizon. Not based on the news in any given day, the rating may differ from Jim Cramer's view or that of this articles's author.

You can view the full analysis from the report here: CONN