One doesn't have to jump over gold coins to score some merchandise at Nintendo's  (NTDOY) only retail store.

At a colossal 10,000 square feet, Nintendo's flagship store at Rockefeller Plaza in New York City carries about 500 items for sale spanning two floors.

On Friday afternoon, the gaming giant's expansive store reopened to lines that stretched around the block after spending over a year getting a massive makeover.

Customers were greeted on the first floor with all sorts of Nintendo paraphernalia, including walls of stuffed Mario and Luigi dolls, Zelda hats, a section to score one of the red-hot selling interactive Amiibo toys and giant selfie-friendly statues of Donkey Kong and Toad.

On the second floor, Nintendo built a 15-by-9-foot video screen that allows people to try out new games and that will take center stage for gaming tournaments. The company may also live stream the upcoming E3 gaming convention being held from June 14-16 in Los Angeles.

Nestled near the video wall, Nintendo pays homage to its history in gaming by featuring in display cases vintage consoles such as the Nintendo NES, GameCube and Gameboy.

"We completely remodeled everything in the store, the design of the fixtures, the layout in order to really pull together the look of our brand found at our retail partners and online," said David Young, assistant manager of public relations for Nintendo of America.

Despite the flagship location drawing over 800,000 visitors each year, Young doesn't expect Nintendo to start aggressively opening stores in prime tourist destinations.

"We have a lot of great retail partners -- our business model is as a manufacturer, and we are not changing that model -- this is the one place where we can interact with fans on a face-to-face basis. It's a special place for us and we don't have plans for other stores right now."

The ode to all things Nintendo arrive at a particularly challenging time for the company. For the fourth quarter ended Dec. 31, 2015, Nintendo reported net income of 29.1 billion yen, or $241.3 million. The company was expected to earn 33.2 billion yen, or $275 million, for the quarter. A year earlier, Nintendo delivered net income of 31.8 billion yen, or $263 million.

Nintendo only sold 1.87 million Wii U consoles and 3.6 million 3DS units during the quarter, as the company was absent in the market with a must-have title and its aging consoles felt the heat from newer offerings such as Sony's (SNE) Playstation 4 and Microsoft's (MSFT) Xbox One.

By comparison, Sony said it sold 5.7 million units of the Playstation 4 during the holidays. Microsoft has not disclosed sales of its Xbox One.

But Nintendo, based in Kyoto, Japan, has several things in store in 2016 that may reignite growth. In March, Nintendo is expected to launch its first smartphone game, Miitomo, in partnership with Japanese mobile-game publisher DeNA. The company is also rumored to be poised to unveil its next piece of hardware -- loosely called Nintendo NX -- at the E3 gaming convention.

Young declined to divulges detail on Nintendo NX, except to say more will be shared soon.

 

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