BALTIMORE (Stockpickr) -- Put down the 10-K filings and the stock screeners. It's time to take a break from the traditional methods of generating investment ideas. Instead, let the crowd do it for you.

From hedge funds to individual investors, scores of market participants are turning to social media to figure out which stocks are worth watching. It's a concept that's known as "crowdsourcing," and it uses the masses to identify emerging trends in the market.

Crowdsourcing has long been a popular tool for the advertising industry, but it also makes a lot of sense as an investment tool. After all, the market is completely driven by the supply and demand, so it can be valuable to see what names are trending among the crowd.

While some fund managers are already trying to leverage social media resources like Twitter to find algorithmic trading opportunities, for most investors, crowdsourcing works best as a starting point for investors who want a starting point in their analysis.

Today, we'll leverage the power of the crowd to take a look at some of the most active stocks on the market.

 

SunEdison


  • Nearest Resistance: $11.75
  • Nearest Support: $9.70
  • Catalyst: Selloff Continuation

It's been a pretty brutal summer for shares of solar solutions provider SunEdison  (SUNE) . Since the middle of July, this $3 billion firm has lost about 70% of its market value, consistently ranking as one of the highest-volume names on the NYSE on the way down.

There's a big disconnect between SunEdison's price tag and its fundamental value right now -- and that's something that bargain-hunters need to keep in mind as they look into buying SunEdison at these lower levels.

From here, SunEdison isn't out of the woods yet. Shares have been forming a large symmetrical triangle pattern, a technical pattern that usually signals a continuation. That could spell a second leg lower at SunEdison this fall. It makes sense to wait for a breakout outside of the symmetrical triangle before trying to make a bet in either direction on this beaten-down solar trade.

Exelon


  • Nearest Resistance: $30
  • Nearest Support: N/A
  • Catalyst: Technical Setup

Utility company Exelon (EXC - Get Report) is another big-name stock that's seeing a technical move this afternoon.

Exelon is bouncing today after a big drop in Tuesday's trading session. The problem is that Tuesday's move lower violated long-term support at $30, a breakdown in shares that is likely to extend Exelon's 22% decline year-to-date.

Don't get lured into "buying a bargain" in Exelon here. This stock is likely to see new lows before the month is out.

Freeport-McMoRan


  • Nearest Resistance: $12
  • Nearest Support: $10
  • Catalyst: Technical Setup

Natural resource stock Freeport-McMoRan  (FCX - Get Report) is down more than 5% on huge volume this afternoon, reacting to yesterday's pop by giving it all back again. Freeport has been selling off hard since May, but shares bottomed back in late August, and they've been making higher lows ever since.

The fact that today's selloff stopped at trend line support looks promising -- and a bounce higher looks like a good buying opportunity in Freeport for investors who aren't risk-averse. With more volatility injected into the market this fall, Freeport is likely to continue to see big swings in both directions in the near-term.

Synchronoss Technologies


  • Nearest Resistance: $38
  • Nearest Support: N/A
  • Catalyst: Verizon Rumors

Finally, shares of mobile phone activation software provider Synchonoss Technologies  (SNCR - Get Report)  are tumbling more than 13% this afternoon, following rumors that the firm could be losing Verizon Communications  (VZ - Get Report) as a customer. After dropping more than 25% early in today's session, more positive notes from analysts at JPMorgan have helped to trim the losses.

Technically speaking, this stock's violation of key $38 support yesterday was a major catalyst for the selling. With a big chunk of buyers tapping out on the $38 breakdown, shares of Synchronoss were free to fall down to current levels. It's best to avoid this small-cap until shares can establish some semblance of support again.

Disclosure: This article is commentary by an independent contributor. At the time of publication, the author held no positions in the stocks mentioned.