NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- For U.S. investors, August couldn't end soon enough.

All three major U.S. indexes finished slightly lower on Monday, the final trading day of August. All told, it was the worst month for the three indexes in three years.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed Monday at 16,528.03, a decline of 115 points, or less than 1%. The S&P 500 Index finished the day at 1,972.18, losing 16.69 points, also less than 1%. The Nasdaq Composite Index closed at 4,776.51, a drop of 51.82 points or 1%.

Several leading tech stocks made some news Monday, but their shares didn't take much of a bounce. Apple (AAPL) and Cisco (CSCO) unveiled a strategic partnership to sell more iPhones and iPads to business customers, according to Recode. Apple's stock closed at $112.76, a decline of less than 1%. Cisco shares closed at $25.88, also a slight decline of less than 1%.

Shares of PayPal Holdings (PYPL) closed at $35, down by less than 1%, even after Barron's reported that the stock could soar by 40% as more customers flock to the digital wallet.


Twitter (TWTR) shares, which have been hard hit in recent weeks, jumped by 3.6% Monday, finishing the day at $27.79. An analyst at SunTrust Robinson Humphrey upgraded the company's shares from neutral to buy, according to the San Jose Mercury News. SunTrust also predicted that Twitter would soon name a new CEO.


MagnaChip Semiconductor (MX) shares soared by 10.5% Monday, closing at $8.55, after Pleasant Lake Partners, an investment firm, offered to buy the South Korean chipmaker, according to Reuters. Pleasant Lake, based in New York, said it would pay $10 a share.

Shares of NCI (NCIT), a Reston, Va., company that provides information technology services to defense, intelligence and civilian agencies, jumped by 11.3% Monday, finishing the day at $14.27. Analysts are bullish on the company's earnings potential, according to Zacks Equity Research.


Netflix (NFLX) lost 2.2% of its value Monday, closing at $115.03, after the company said Sunday that it would not renew its licensing agreement with Epix, focusing instead on original and exclusive content, according to L.A. Biz. As a result, Netflix will lose the rights to several popular movies, including "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire." Those movies will be shown on Hulu.

This article is commentary by an independent contributor. At the time of publication, the author held no positions in the stocks mentioned.