NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- There's a business for every need--and even some you didn't know you had.

Take a company called Lingerie Fighting Championships (BOTY) It's an actual business with real shareholders--although not many.

Its business is pretty much what its name implies--less-than-genuine wrestling competitions where scantily clad ladies duke it out à la World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE - Get Report) In case you didn't notice, its stock symbol is BOTY, as in booty.

Its shares are traded on the OTC Pink market--a speculative, loosely regulated market--at $5 a share. There's not much volume.

The Las Vegas-based company filed documentation with the SEC on Thursday to sell an additional 3.9 million shares of its common stock.

"We are excited about going public because it allows us to bring more attention to the Lingerie Fighting Championships and to further build our brand," said company CEO Shaun Donnelly in a statement via email to TheStreet.

So far, the company has hosted only one event--The Lingerie Fighting Championships 20: A Midsummer Night's Dream was held in Las Vegas on Aug. 8. LFC hopes to put together its second event in October, but with just $117,000 in working capital, the budget may be a bit tight.

Connelly noted the event was "very well received by fans," and was featured on multiple cable and satellite systems including AT&T, Charter, Comcast and more.

Whether or not you buy it, LFC isn't the only company out there with an unconventional business.

Here are 10 others, some of which also sell stock, that offer some pretty colorful products or services.

This Is Why I'm Broke

Online magazine This Is Why I'm Broke is a one-stop-shop for the most ludicrous things you can buy on the internet. It embodies everything that's wrong with consumerism ... and/or completely awesome about it.

Items currently listed on the This Is Why I'm Broke website include the Battleship drinking game, a message in a bottle kit and a real feather chief headdress.

It also features a superconductor hoverboard, made by Lexus.

JOE'S Jeans

Los Angeles-based JOE'S Jeans (JOEZ) isn't exactly your average clothing company. It does offer your standard collection of apparel, denim and otherwise, but it has also launched a new line of pants that let you charge your phone on your butt.

Its #Hello jeans line is designed with a pocket to hold the Apple (AAPL - Get Report) iPhone as well as a slim battery for charging. All wearers do is slide the battery into the battery pocket, connect it to a cower cord, and place their phones in the "secret side pocket."

The jeans are available for both men and women -- battery not included. That you have to buy separately.

Skell

Skell, "a killer company," is all about the war against bugs. The startup is the maker of is Bug-A-Salt, a gun that fires table salt to kill flies and other insects.

Available in both yellow and camouflage colors, the gun turns table salt into a lethal projectile. It fires with accuracy in a range of three feet, and the loader cap, when filled up, can hold about 50 shots.

Skell also knows cleaning up dead insects sucks, which is why it advertises on its website that "bugs will remain whole for easy clean up."

Its other products include the Mr. Pinch Key Chain, the Bug-A-Salt Evolution T-Shirt, and Fuggin Maggots, which it promises will grow into target practice (as in, flies) in a week.

SomethingStore

"We find gifts for you, so you don't have to" is the slogan of SomethingStore, a company located in Long Island, New York.

The premise is simple: you give SomethingStore $10, and it sends you something.

"It may be something you need, something you want or something you desire," the company website reads. It lists a handful of possibilities, ranging from a rare book to a party game, set of kitchen lives, crafting tool or office supply items.

SomethingStore makes two guarantees -- that your something will be new, and that it will be worth $10.

FarmersOnly Media

FarmersOnly Media is the entity behind FarmersOnly.com, an online dating platform for farmers and ranchers.

Jerry Miller came up for the idea for FarmersOnly in 2005 when a friend of his tried to get back into the dating scene after divorcing. She knew meeting someone would be tough working on a farm all day.

After a month in the online dating world, she grew frustrated, because "city folks just don't get it." Hence, an idea was born.

FarmersOnly.com now claims to have more than two million members. Country star Brad Paisley even tweeted about it.

Las Vegas Wedding Wagon

The Las Vegas Wedding Wagon puts matrimony in motion, with prices starting at just $129.

Couples choose a location, date, time and ceremony through the website's online booking system, and the Wedding Wagon team appears on the big day. They bring with them their mobile chapel, dressed with purple curtains, an LED-lit altar and flowers for ceremonies that last about 30 to 45 minutes each.

The Las Vegas Strip Wedding, Park Wedding and Not Sure Yet!?! Wedding packages are the most economic options, but fancier - and pricier - themes are available as well. The Chapel Wedding in Paradise costs $299, the Premium Park Wedding $349, and the Bus Tour Wedding $975.

Be advised that you need to obtain a marriage license for a legal ceremony.

Alibi Network

Up to something shady? Alibi Network has you covered.

The full-service agency provides alibis and excuses to help people maneuver the stickiest of situations. Services provided include virtual (and fake) confirmations, seminars, jobs, hotels and even friends.

Clients can choose between local and out-of-town alibis and have their explanations validated by live operators.

Alibi Network promises complete privacy and anonymity -- but we all know how that can turn out. Case in point: all of those names that just public from cheating site Ashley Madison.

Drink Wisconsinbly

Dubbed Wisconsin's unofficial official lifestyle brand, Drink Wisconsinbly makes money based on the premise that Wisconsinites drink a lot and are proud of it -- an assessment that, according to this 2008 New York Times article, could potentially be fair.

The brand is owned by Richard Lorbach of Pixel1Media LLC in Waukesha, Wisconsin and distributed by 30 Watt Inc., which, ironically, is based in Minnesota. It sells a number of items, including t-shirts, mugs and bottle openers.

"From church festivals and ice shanties to tailgates and taverns, no other state pours it as liberally or does it as multi-generationally as we do," its website reads. The brand slogan: "It's last call ... again."

Other Badger-state-themed brands are in the works as well, including Fight Wisconsinbly, Hunt Wisconsinbly and Fish Wisconsinbly.

Lucky Break

Thanksgiving can get super awkward for lots of reasons. Who gets to break the wishbone at the end of dinner doesn't have to be one of them, thanks to Lucky Break.

The company makes and distributes plastic wishbones that come in packages of four to 10. Buyers can also customize their wishbones, printing special messages on them, creating specific packaging, or requesting them in different colors.

Goose Masters

Geese are apparently a tough bunch, hence the existence of Goose Masters, a North Carolina-based company that handles goose problems.

The company helps to keep geese away from golf courses, corporate properties, beaches and other areas. How? Through the use of a Border Collie goose dog to scare the birds off. According to the company's website, Goose Masters has raised, trained and handled three national champion dogs.

The time to see results can vary, depending on property size and degree of infestation.

 

This article is commentary by an independent contributor. At the time of publication, the author held no positions in the stocks mentioned.