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NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- What was once loved is now hated, Jim Cramer told his Mad Money viewers Monday. Unfortunately, it's likely to stay that way for a while. Cramer identified five distinct groups of stocks he said investors need to now approach with caution.

The first group is any company involved with commodities. With China slowing dramatically, the action in stocks such as Vale (VALE - Get Report), down 86% over the past five years, and Glencore (GLCNF), down 77% this year alone, are simply horrendous. Whether it's iron, steel, or copper, steer clear.

The second hated group are oil and gas stocks. Everything from Anadarko Petroleum (APC) to Chevron (CVX - Get Report) to Schlumberger (SLB - Get Report) to Ensco (ESV) and beyond are all getting crushed.

The third group is an unlikely one -- biotech. This group is typically immune to market declines because they have secular growth and pricing power. But with political candidates taking aim at drug prices, that may not be the case this time.

The fourth despised group of stocks is any company that needs cheap debt to grow. Think rollups like SunEdison (SUNE). These companies did too many deals and now may be shrinking in a rising interest rate environment.

The last sector to be frowned upon are the growth stocks with no earnings. The markets simply have no tolerance for the likes of Workday (WDAY - Get Report) or FireEye (FEYE - Get Report), even though these are fabulous companies, according to Cramer.

Executive Decision: Klaus Klenfeld

For his "Executive Decision" segment, Cramer spoke with Klaus Kleinfeld, chairman and CEO of Alcoa (AA - Get Report), a stock that soared 5.7% on an otherwise down day after the company announced it is splitting itself into two entities.

Kleinfeld explained that as a 126-year-old company, it's important to both reinvent yourself from time to time, but also to carefully consider your decisions thoroughly.

For the past few years, Alcoa has been building up its value-added and its upstream commodity businesses, and now the company feels both have the size, scale and strength to be competitive on their own.

Kleinfeld said that while the capital structure for the two entities has not yet been finalized, the value-added business will have investment-grade debt, while the upstream company is targeting just below that mark. Both entities, however, will be a win for Alcoa's shareholders, bondholders, employees and customers.

Cramer said Alcoa clearly knows how to bring out value.

Roll Out of Rollups

Why are the stocks of so-called rollup companies on the decline? It doesn't have anything to do with stocks at all, Cramer explained, but with the high-yield bond market.

High-yield bonds are in the blast zone right now and even activist hedge fund manager Carl Icahn is warning investors to beware. The problem? Many of these rollup companies need cheap money to keep growing, and the days of cheap money may be coming to a close.

That's why a stock like XPO Logistics (XPO - Get Report), whose CEO appeared on Mad Money just last week, has seen its stock slide 46% for the year, despite making several smart acquisitions such as its recent purchase of Con-way (CNW).

That's also why other rollups, like Valiant Pharmaceuticals (VRX) and Platform Specialty Products (PAH) have seen their stocks crushed, with Platform also falling 44% for the year.

This market wants as little risk as possible, Cramer concluded, and high-yield bonds are no longer on the menu.

Executive Decision: Paul Raines

In his second "Executive Decision" segment, Cramer spoke with Paul Raines, CEO of GameStop (GME - Get Report), the video game retailer that's seen its stock struggle since reporting earnings on Aug 27.

Raines said that he's still a believer in the GameStop story, especially given the strong 8% rise in same-store sales, earnings per share up 41% and expanding gross margins.

Raines said GameStop has diversified away from the boom-or-bust video game cycle and is now a family of tech brands that includes collectibles such as many items from the upcoming Star Wars movie. GameStop acquired the Web site ThinkGeek.com as a foray into this category.

That's why GameStop has been able to rack up over 40 million customers on their loyalty programs, Raines noted, as customers love the products and trust the brands.

Lightning Round

In the Lightning Round, Cramer was bullish on Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMY - Get Report), Eli Lilly (LLY - Get Report), PPG Industries (PPG) and WhiteWave Foods (WWAV).

Cramer was bearish on Johnson Controls (JCI - Get Report), Jacobs Engineering (JEC - Get Report), La Jolla Pharmaceutical (LJPC - Get Report), Sherwin-Williams (SHW - Get Report), Superior Energy Services (SPN - Get Report) and Spark Therapeutics (ONCE - Get Report).

Executive Decision: Jason Gorevic

In his third "Executive Decision" segment, Cramer also sat down with Jason Gorevic, CEO of Teladoc (TDOC - Get Report), a stock that came public on July 1 and rose to a high of $35 a share before declining with the rest of the markets to just above $20 a share today.

Gorevic said Teladoc continues to see strong growth and now has over 6,000 clients and 20 health plans signed up for its services. There is still plenty of growth ahead, however, and the market is barely penetrated.

Teladoc has also partnered with CVS Health (CVS - Get Report) and is providing online services in certain areas, while in others is referring online patients to CVS Minute-Clinic locations when needed.

When asked about profitability, Gorevic said the company has a plan towards profits in 2017 but continues to invest in growth in the meantime.

To watch replays of Cramer's video segments, visit the Mad Money page on CNBC.

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At the time of publication, Cramer's Action Alerts PLUS had a position in WWAV.