These 11 College Majors Will Get You a Job

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- It might seem like the dog days of summer, but for many college students, the fall term starts next month. And that means getting serious about which area to major in, especially if you want job prospects after graduation.

The good news is hiring is on an upswing and the outlook is the best since 2007. Starting salaries are also on the rise. And while employers in the health care and information technology industries are two areas where hiring is hot, there are plenty of other sectors hiring. The trouble is picking the right major to prepare for one of these growing industries.

CareerBuilder.com listed the 11 most in-demand college majors. Check out which majors made the list and what types of jobs the degree will prepare you for after graduation.


11. Education and Teaching

Approximately 7% of employers named education as a sought after major, according to CareerBuilder.

Someone who majors in education and teaching learns "instructional programs that focus on the theory and practice of learning and teaching, and related research, administrative and support services," according to Careers.org.

Besides a job as a teacher, which can span grade level and specialization, those with education and teaching degrees can also become interpreters and translators, coaches and scouts, and administrative executives.

 


10. Science Technologies

Some 8% of employers named science technologies as a sought after major, according to CareerBuilder.

A major in science technologies learns to "apply scientific principles and technical skills in support of scientific research and development," according to Careers.org.

Jobs associated with this major can vary, including: biology technicians, chemical equipment operators, nuclear power technicians, and environmental science technicians. Other jobs associated with the major include science teachers, and HVAC technician, among others.

 

9. Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Studies and Humanities

Approximately 9% of employers named liberal arts and sciences, general studies and humanities as a sought after major, according to CareerBuilder.

A liberal arts major studies "human concepts, inquiries and pursuits, such as literature, history, philosophy and theater."

The general degree can help students prepare for a variety of jobs and careers including teachers, film editors, and administrative managers, to name a few.

 

 

8. Communications and Journalism

Approximately 10% of employers named communications and journalism as a sought after major, according to CareerBuilder.

A communications and journalism major focuses on "how messages in various media are produced, used, and interpreted within and across different contexts, channels, and cultures, and that prepare individuals to apply communication knowledge and skills professionally," The College Board said.

Jobs associated with this major include: journalism and writing, radio, television and digital communications; public relations and advertising; publishing, social media and others.

 

 

7. Engineering Technologies

Approximately 12% of employers named engineering technologies as a sought after major, according to CareerBuilder.

"Why are some car parts made from plastic while others are shaped from metal? How does a refrigerator work? What's the best way to build a robot that can weld? If knowing what makes things tick is just the beginning for you -- if you want to know how to make them tick -- then consider a major in engineering technology," said The College Board.

Engineering technology is a more specialized engineering major. Students learn many of the same concepts as engineering majors but have the option of earning an associate's degree in the major, which can be completed in two years.
 

 


6. Communications Technologies

Approximately 12% of employers named communications technologies as a sought after major, according to CareerBuilder.

Majoring in communication technologies prepares students to "function as equipment operators, support technicians and operations managers in the film/video, recording and graphic communications industries," Career.org said.

Jobs related to this major include: audiovisual communications tech, graphics communications, and radio and TV broadcast technology.

 

5. Health Professions and Related Clinical Sciences

Approximately 14% of employers named health professions and related clinical services as a sought after major, according to CareerBuilder.

A major in health professions and related clinical services prepares students to "practice as licensed professionals and assistants" in related health care professions and clinical sciences as well as administrative and support services, according to Careers.org.

Jobs related to this major include: dentistry, optometry, pharmacology, public health, veterinary science, nursing, psychology, among many others.

 

 

4. Math and Statistics

Approximately 14% of employers named math and statistics as a sought after major, according to CareerBuilder.

Within the study of math and statistics as a major specializations include calculus, algebra, probability theory and computing, which can lead to jobs within any number of industries that use mathematical principles as a basis for job functions. A few examples -- scheduling airline flights, interest rates on mortgages and political polls, show the diversity of jobs that use math and statistics.

 

3. Engineering

Approximately 18% of employers named engineering as a sought after major, according to CareerBuilder.

Engineering is another broad subject area covering many topics and can offers several areas of specialization, including aerospace, manufacturing, electrical, computer science, environmental, civil and software, for instance.

Obtaining a bachelor's degree in engineering means graduates can "go on to coordinate teams of engineers, oversee product development from invention to market, or use your engineering know-how in a non-engineering field, such as law or medicine," according to The College Board.

 

 

2. Computer and Information Sciences

Approximately 27% of employers named computer and information sciences as a sought after major, according to CareerBuilder.

Students majoring in computer and information sciences will study a broad range of computer topics. Computer science majors specifically will learn how to develop, install and troubleshoot computer systems.

 

1. Business

Approximately 38% of employers named business as a sought after major, according to CareerBuilder.

Choosing a business major can span a broad spectrum of areas and prepare a student to work in a variety of industries, government and even non-profit organizations.

Business majors come in a variety of specializations, from accounting, finance, business management and administration, marketing, sales and international business.

Often students who earn a bachelor's degree in business go on to obtain their master's degree in business administration, or MBA.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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